6th Congressional District High School Art Competition and Exhibition: March 7, 2015

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2015 marks the 21st year that Montserrat College of Art has hosted the 6th Congressional District High School Art Competition and Exhibition. Please join us for the annual Art Competition and Exhibition sponsored by Congressman Seth Moulton and hosted by Montserrat College of Art. The closing reception and award ceremony will take place Saturday, March 7, 3:30 – 5 p.m. at our 301 Gallery located at 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA and the exhibition will be on view March 5 – 7, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m..

The exhibition is a juried art show, open to high school students (grades 10-12) from public and private schools within the Sixth Congressional District of Massachusetts, as well as high school students home-schooled within the district. Students from every school in the district are encouraged to participate.

The Award Winners will receive varying amounts of scholarship to Montserrat’s Summer Pre-College Program and the U.S. Postal Service will provide students with the option of having their artwork displayed at their local post office.

At the conclusion of the exhibition, the artwork of the Grand Award Winner will be sent to the U.S. Capitol Building where it will be displayed for one year with the work of other award winners from across the country. The winner from each district, accompanied by one adult, will be invited to attend the opening of that exhibition in Washington, D.C. to be scheduled for a date in June.

For more information, visit www.montserrat.edu/news/HS_Congressional.php or feel free to contact elizabeth.gianino@montserrat.edu


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President Immerman Named 2015 Business Person of the Year

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0913_immerman1-600We’re excited to announce that Montserrat College of Art President Steve Immerman has been named as 2015 Business Person of the Year by Beverly Chamber’s Annual Business Awards, on Thursday, February 26, at the Danversport Yacht Club.

Beverly is “a community that knows how to get things done.” – President Steve Immerman

Montserrat College of Art was also nominated as Nonprofit of the Year.

Learn more at www.greaterbeverlychamber.com.

Congratulations, Steve!


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Montserrat College of Art to possibly join Salem State University

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Montserrat College of Art to possibly join Salem State University Both boards agree to exploratory process 

Salem State University President Patricia Maguire Meservey and Montserrat College of Art President Stephen D. Immerman announced this afternoon that the two institutions have entered into a formal discussion regarding the feasibility of Montserrat College of Art joining Salem State University.

In communications with students, faculty and staff on both campuses, Meservey and Immerman revealed that an initial and confidential due diligence process had concluded and that “we are excited by the potentially significant benefits of such an integration.” The boards of trustees on both campuses have agreed to move forward with the next stage of due diligence to determine the feasibility of joining MCA to SSU and to work through the details of such an effort with both campus communities, emphasizing that the goal would be to have a final agreement in place by July 2015. If finalized, it is anticipated that the full implementation will take effect in the 2017-2018 academic year.

Both presidents stated that the reason for publicly announcing this initiative is to “bring both communities into the discussions necessary to more thoroughly consider all implications of this proposal.”

“Montserrat offers a unique brand of arts education for a unique student population,” said Immerman, “however, as a small, private college with less than 400 students, it is challenging to provide the resources needed to maintain and grow the competitive advantages needed for working artists. By joining Salem State, we believe that we can ensure that the Montserrat name and the college’s tradition of excellence and student-centered education will remain available for future generations of aspiring artists and designers.”

“Joining these two institutions would bring together extraordinarily talented faculty and students from both programs,” said Salem State’s Meservey, and “would enhance opportunities for collaboration and expand access to a broader array of artistic and student centered facilities on both Salem and Beverly campuses.” She went on to add that, “this would be a unique academic program on the North Shore, serving students who find their passion in the arts.”

Both presidents acknowledged that there is much more work to be done in assessing the details of such an agreement and stressed that the process is still in the exploratory phase.  Committees comprised of faculty and staff from both campuses will work to evaluate potential benefits and impacts to the students, faculty, staff, alumni and supporters of each institution.

Salem State University, established in 1854, is a comprehensive, public institution of higher learning located approximately 15 miles north of Boston, Massachusetts. The university enrolls 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students representing 44 states and 61 nations, and is one of the largest state universities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  With over 200 veterans currently enrolled, Salem State has been designated a Military Friendly institution by G.I. Jobs, placing it in the top 20% of schools nationwide.

Montserrat College of Art is a small, private, residential college of visual art and design, with a student population of 385 students. Founded in 1970, by artists, for artists, Montserrat educates the creative problem solvers of tomorrow. The college offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, continuing education classes for teens and adults, and four galleries exhibiting works by international, national and regional contemporary artists.

Contact:

Jo Broderick
978.867.9613 (office)
978.590.6443 (cell)
jo.broderick@montserrat.edu

Karen Murray Cady
978.542.7503 (office)
508.523.4524 (cell)
karen.cady@salemstate.edu


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Montserrat Hosts Annual Artrageous!29 Auction Party March 28

Montserrat Artrageous29 Auction Party

Montserrat College of Art will host its annual Artrageous!29 Auction Party Saturday, March 28 at 6 p.m. 20 Cherry Hill Drive, Danvers, MA.

Artrageous!29 has become the signature spring event on the North Shore. Last year’s event sold out, drew more than 1,000 guests and raised $432,000 to benefit financial aid awards for deserving Montserrat students.

The night offers guests the chance to witness Montserrat’s accomplished students creating artwork in live Art-in-the-Moment stations. There will be more than 250 pieces of art auctioned off for all tastes and budgets donated by faculty, students, staff and alumni of Montserrat, as well as from established and emerging artists from the North Shore to New York to Los Angeles. Artwork includes paintings, prints, photographs, sculpture, mixed media and more. There will also be live music and sumptuous food by Capers Catering.

This year’s honorary chair is Beverly native Jack Barnes, president and CEO of People’s United Bank and the featured artist is internationally known artist Bill Thompson, originally from Ipswich. The lead sponsors are People’s United Bank, Windover Construction, Inc., John Drislane and Chuck Thibeault, Footprint Power, Hal and Jodi Hess, Pinck & Co. and Brookwood Financial Partners, LLC.

For further information about Artrageous!29 tickets and art previews visit auction.montserrat.edu or contact Erin Carter at erin.carter@montserrat.edu, 978-921-4242 x1114.

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Alumni News: Don Mathias ’98 Featured in “Comically” Speaking Exhibit

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'Comically Speaking' shows the humorous side of art

‘Comically Speaking’ shows the humorous side of art

Thursday, February 5, 2015, By Terry Date Staff Writer

As a boy growing up in Andover, the first thing that Don Mathias (’98) would do each day was tear open the newspaper to the comics. Favorites included “Bloom County,” “Peanuts” and “Garfield.”

Today, his online comic strip, “Peanizles,” draws inspiration from them. The urban strip, which has been published by Skope Magazine since 2002, also plays with meta humor, a comic twist tinged with irony. Characters step out of their roles to make light of their presence in a comic strip — an additional layer of humor, an inside joke that everyone is in on.

The 43-year-old freelance illustrator and cartoonist who once published a weekly family comic strip in The Andover Townsman is among five artists who are showing their humor-driven illustrations and drawings in a new exhibit that opened last month at Essex Art Center in Lawrence.

In the years since graduating in 1998, Mathias has been producing a variety of freelance illustration in all aspects of publishing, the film industry and theater. His cartoons and comic strips have appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers across the globe.

“Entering Andover,” a family strip, appeared in The Townsman for about 10 years.

Mathias, who has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in illustration and graphic design from Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, is well-acquainted with the Essex Art Center, where he teaches comic illustration, said Sara Hildago, director of the center’s Sidell Gallery.

Hildago said Mathias is successful in presenting the world through children’s eyes in “Peanizles.”

“He reminds me of a kid,” she said.

Mathias said he is good friends with his fellow exhibitors in the Essex Art Center show — David Sullivan, Sage Stossel, Mark Parisi and John Klossner. The artists draw on their lives and observations for inspiration, he said, and their works blend words and graphics in interesting ways, presenting a range of comedic approaches.

Take Stossel, of Cambridge, a cartoonist who recently became a mom. Some of her cartoons reflect on new motherhood, an often frazzling adventure of 24/7 baby care including bouncing, feeding and cleaning. The executive editor of The Atlantic Online, she is showing a mix of work at the exhibit — pieces on parenting, current events and more.

Sullivan, of Dracut, makes caricatures of real people, and tends to be more political, Hidalgo said. His clients include national publications, textbook publishers and Web designers.

Political cartoonists were once a media staple. Sullivan’s work continues the tradition, drawing on local humor and issues and thought-provoking items, Mathias said.

“It’s neat to see somebody be able to do that,” Mathias said.

Parisi, a Gloucester native who now lives in Melrose, does single-panel comedic drawings. His humor is all over the place. His characters are new creations each day. “It’s really good stuff,” Mathias said.

Klossner’s cartoons and illustrations have appeared in The New Yorker, Barron’s, The Wall Street Journal and other publications. The Maine resident does fine-line work, New Yorker-style social commentary and technology cartoons.

Mathias said New England is full of cartoonists. It’s a region of creative and independent thinkers ready to push the boundaries of their work. And the exhibit is illustrates that well, he said.

What: “Comically Speaking,” an exhibit of cartoonists’ works

When: Through March 6. Regular hours are Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Where: Essex Art Center, 56 Island St., Lawrence

More information: Call 978-685-2343 or visit www.essexartcenter.org. For more on Andover artist Don Mathias’ work, visit www.punkrockcartoonist.com.

Courtesy of The Andover Townsman


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Where Creativity Works for Adam Miller ‘00

“It sounds cliché, but my education provided me with a tool box. Once I had that box, it allowed me to go out in the world and fill it with the tools I would need to attempt art as a career.” - Adam Miller ‘00

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Adam Miller ‘00 was the Creative Director for Terminal Press, a new York based comic book publisher. He co-created the ZombieBomb! Comic Anthology in 2009 which became the company’s largest selling title. With other alumni, he is involved in the publication of the Chroma series of art annuals featuring New England’s most talented underground artists. He also works with agencies in the city of Lynn to promote the arts. Recently, he dove back into exhibiting his photography, one of his first loves. His work is a combination of painting, drawing, photography and collage.

Miller is part of Montserrat College of Art Galleries’ SEVEN exhibit where seven artists are invited to draw directly onto the seven walls of Montserrat Gallery over the course of seven weeks. The gallery will act as an open studio over the course of each artist’s week-long residency, students and guests are welcome to come in.

Adam Miller’s SEVEN Reception: Friday, Feb. 13, 7 – 9 pm
Montserrat Galleries, 23 Essex St, Beverly, MA

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Improbable Places Poetry Tour at The Cabot: February 19

2015-01-06 13_21_41-poetry - Windows Photo ViewerThe Improbable Places Poetry Tour will kick off the New Year with a night of poetry in the newly reopened Cabot Theatre. Poetry will take center stage for one night only on Thursday, February 19th, 7 – 9 pm. Opened in 1920 as a dream palace of vaudeville and silent movies, the beautiful Cabot Theatre has recently been renovated. The Cabot is located at 286 Cabot Street, Beverly MA. Learn more at thecabot.org.

What’s this tour all about? It’s Montserrat College of Art’s way of bringing together student writers, local poets, area businesses and enthusiastic listeners to celebrate the power of poetry and community. At each tour stop a new venue and theme is selected. The last tour stop was at the recently decommissioned and iconic Footprint Power’s Salem Harbor Station in Salem, MA, built in the 1950′s.The massive turbines were quiet, but poetry spoke loudly to the power of work and the work of power.

An Iconic Theatre, huh?  That’s right, folks. Poetry is on the marquee. We are seeking poems in any style that speak to the rich history of the Cabot. We also want movie poems, from blockbusters to cult classics. And poems about magic! Disappearing acts and gold capes. Someone must have a villanelle about buttery popcorn and Snow Caps. We promise a night of magic and drama.

I’ve got a great poem about The Princess Bride. Can I read it on the stage?  We are accepting submissions via email at colleen.michaels@montserrat.edu and in the Writing Studio, located at 248 Cabot Street, Montserrat College of Art. The deadline is Monday, February 16th. We’d love to read your work!  

I don’t write poetry, but I sure am interested in this tour. Can I still attend the event? Sure! The event is free and open to the public.  The concession stand will have all your favorites for sale and gift certificates to the theatre will be available to purchase. Come to applaud poetry and support the return of The Cabot.

Wait! I still have questions. Just ask Colleen Michaels, Montserrat’s Writing Studio Director. She’s at colleen.michaels@montserrat.edu.

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Founding Faculty News: Roger Martin Exhibits at The Cape Ann Museum

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Bill of Lading: The Art & Poetry of Roger Martin
OPENING RECEPTION: Saturday, Feb. 14, 3 – 5 p.m.

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present Bill of Lading, a special exhibition exploring the art and poetry of Roger Martin. A founder of Montserrat College of Art and a long-time member of its faculty, Roger Martin is Rockport’s first poet laureate and author of three books celebrating the people and poetry of his hometown. 

Also a highly re­spected graphic designer, illustrator and painter, Roger Martin has long been-and continues to be-one of Cape Ann’s most distinguished and creative artists. The exhibition opens with a public reception and will remain on display through June 28, 2015. For exhibition-related programs please visit capeannmuseum.org.

Image credit: November Tide, 2003, oil and oil stick on canvas. Collection of the artist.

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Alumni News: Ashley Brown ’07 Designs Banners for Urban Outfitters

Dreamers + Doers: Secret Holiday

Courtesy of Urban Outfitters Blog

Initially, Montserrat College of Art alumna Ashley Brown ’07, owner Secret Holiday & Co., created work for self-assurance, “a reminder to keep moving forward.” The Massachusetts-based designer today makes a series of minimal yet historically-informed pennant banners inspired by the Woman’s Suffrage Movement emblazoned with reminders of affirmation — “It’s Ok,” “Wild and Free,” “Let It Go.” This January, Urban Outfitters (UO) collaborated with Ashley on a series of exclusive banners. They caught up with her as a part of UO Dreamers + Doers series, which explores the stories of inspiring artists, designers and makers who are doing things their own way. Read on for a look at her studio and to hear more of how she turned her love of DIY art and traditional craft into a full-fledged business.

Can you share more about your background? How did you get started sewing and making things with your hands and how did that evolve into Secret Holiday?

I’ve been making things for as long as I can remember. My mother taught me how to quilt at an early age, and I was a pretty serious painter in high school. I ended up at Montserrat College of Art where I worked in lots of mediums and used my crafting skills in nearly everything I made. I began a love affair with fine art and DIY culture. My work was very conceptual, dealing with personal themes and a strong feminist perspective. I began making and selling tiny stuffed creatures in 2005 as a way to sort of balance out the heavy emotions that came from my “real work.” I called these creatures Fern Animals, and they launched my career via Etsy and the indie craft scene nearly immediately. Secret Holiday followed a few years later as I refined my aesthetic and purpose.

Can you remember when your “ah ha” moment was for the concept of making the banners?

I created the very first “It’s OK” banner for myself, because I needed the reassurance. I was working multiple jobs at the time, and never seemed to have enough free time to bring all my ideas to fruition. I was looking at a lot of imagery from the Woman’s Suffrage Movement, and was especially interested in the handwork involved behind the scenes. Not only were these women fighting for their rights, but they were also creating by hand every sash worn, every banner carried. I was moved by that thought alone. The time spent stitching each letter on an object that would move people to think, to act. I knew I wanted to work with this idea somehow (I actually intended to make affirmation quilts). Very early into this project I stumbled upon a couple other artists using affirmations in wall hangings and I began to feel defeated before I even got started, even though their work was nothing like what I wanted to make. It’s so easy to fall into that trap with the Internet. So I created the “It’s OK” banner to remind myself to keep moving forward. To make my own work, my own way. I never expected to be making that same Affirmation Banner five years later!

Is Secret Holiday your full-time job? What were you doing before this? 

Yes, Secret Holiday is my full time job. Most mornings I still have to pinch myself when I remember I don’t have to go work for someone else. I started doing SH&Co full time in September of 2013. Before that I had lots of different jobs, often multiple jobs at the same time. My husband is also an artist, so we’ve taken turns for the past number of years, one working more at a “job-job” while the other focused on their art, and then trading off. I’ve worked at a candy store, a grocery store, an online fabric retailer, a catering company, and most often as a nanny. Working as artists has always been our top priority, so neither of us has sought out anything that would take away from our art-making. We were pretty poor for many years because of this, but it’s all been totally worth it for us.

How long does it take you to make one of the banners? What all goes into the process of putting one together? 

It takes so long! It’s definitely gotten quicker after having now made nearly 2000, but there are a lot of steps involved. Each banner starts with hand-cutting the letters, laying out the banners (cutting the shape, placing the letters), machine-stitching the text, sewing on the backing, ironing right-side-out, sewing a hem, hand-sanding and staining a dowel, adding the dowel and twine for hanging, and finally, trimming loose threads and cleaning up with a lint roller. Oh, and hand stamping and numbering a hangtag. There are many steps involved in each and every banner made, but every detail is important.

Can you walk us through a typical day in your life? 

Most days are about production. We’ve been pretty busy the past few months working on holiday orders, and a two very large wholesale orders, so we typically have multiple piles of banners going at a time. I tend to work late into the night, so I usually to get to the studio around 11am. I’ll start by laying out a stack of banners with any new letters I’d cut the night before. When my assistant Kaly comes in, she sets right to work stitching the letters on (she’s a real champion and can sew the same thing for hours!) We’ve fallen into a pretty good routine, rotating around the large studio table from stack to stack, sewing, ironing, finishing, repeat. When I get home in the evening, I usually end up cutting letters for a few hours, in preparation for the next day. Somewhere in there I also find time to pack orders and respond to emails.

Do you have any other creative projects in the works, or ideas you’re looking forward to acting on in 2015?

I have so many projects I want to work on! I’ve always loved quilting and really need to find time to make quilts again. I have a ton of banner scraps that I’ve begun dyeing with natural indigo. I’m looking forward to working those into a quilt or two, and making pouches. I also want to work on expanding my shop to include more goods, possibly some work by close friends and fellow artists. I’ve got big plans for 2015.

Can you share more about the special pieces you made for UO? 

I was really excited when UO approached me about collaborating. I knew immediately that I wanted to create something youthful and romantic. Since most of my designs are created solely by me, it was a lot of fun to be sent a mood board and have the input of a whole design team. I’m excited to see the rooms these banners end up in!

What are some of the challenges of running your own business? What are the best parts?

Maybe my biggest challenge right now: letting go enough to grow. I think I really like doing things the hard way sometimes, like continuing to hand-write the address on each outgoing package. It takes a lot longer than printing out a label, but I feel more connected to each customer that way, and it feels more personal. And if someone emails to enquire about their package, I can specifically remember packing it up myself, no matter how many other orders I’d packed that same day because I took the time to write out their name. I’m sure it won’t always stay like this, and I’m sure that time could be better spent doing a different job, but I like my system for now. It’s pretty amazing to start a business from nothing, learn as you go, and then suddenly step back and look at all that has changed and progressed. And take note of the funny things you still do in exactly the same way.

Can you offer some advice for other young entrepreneurs looking to create and sell their own work? 

Make something you believe in. Don’t just make stuff you think people will buy. It won’t work (at least not for the long haul). You have to create something you can stand behind 100 percent. Something that is uniquely yours and made to the best of your ability. Be willing to start off slow, find the best materials, learn the best techniques, be willing to even fail a little, but don’t let that get you down. I was making banners for years before they really caught on. One day I just decided it was time to quit my other jobs and go for it; throw myself into it completely. I took the risk and it worked! I guess I’m pretty superstitious, but I kinda think no one took me seriously until I took myself seriously. If you really want it, you just have make it happen.

Your work is ALL OVER the Internet! It’s awesome! Can you share any stories that stand out about when you’ve seen your work in other people’s homes, or when you’ve been surprised or excited by where your work has turned up?

It is awesome seeing my work everywhere! I feel incredibly honored to have my banners hanging in so many homes around the world. I could list a few popular blogs I’ve been excited to see my banners pop up on, but honestly, I get just as excited when an ordinary, everyday person posts a photo to Instagram and tags me in it. I love seeing all the different spaces my work can occupy, but most of all I love the captions that often accompany the photos. It makes me feel so good about what I do when I receive messages saying how a simple wallhanging brought peace of mind to a stranger. I get emails like this all the time too and it’s amazing. Someone will contact me wanting to purchase a “Be Brave” banner for a close friend who’s been going through a tough time, or a mother wants to hang an “It’s Ok” banner above their baby’s crib. It reaffirms all of my reasons for doing what I do. It makes all the long hours of cutting and sewing so very worth it.

Courtesy of Urban Outfitters Blog


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Where Creativity Works for Cory Wasnewsky ‘14

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“Montserrat attracted me with its small size, yet big possibilities.”

Cory Wasnewsky ‘14 had no idea that his internship at Hatch Show Print would turn into his first job only a few months after graduating in May 2014 with a focus in Book Arts. As a student, “there was always a running joke that I lived in the [Montserrat] printmaking basement,” he said.

A year after completing a highly competitive two month internship in the summer of 2013, the Hatch Show Print manager offered him a job as a production designer and printer. Hatch Show Print is a 136-year-old printing company in Nashville, TN, and is one of the oldest working letterpress print shops in America. They created many of the posters of great jazz, blues and rock ‘n’ roll entertainers like Cab Calloway, Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong.

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Illustration Theme Show: Shakespeare

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This year’s theme for the Annual Illustration Theme Show is Shakespeare! Current student work is shown alongside faculty, staff and alumni in a broad range of method and media.

Reception: Wed., Feb. 4, 5-8 pm
On view: Jan. 26 – Feb. 6, 2015

301 Gallery, 301 Cabot St, Beverly, MA
Hours: Mon. – Fri. 11:30 am – 2:30 pm & Sat. 12 – 5 pm

Poster by Montserrat College of Art Faculty Member David Ferreira

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Montserrat Welcomes Director of the Studio for Experiential Learning, Kate Luchini

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Montserrat College of Art has appointed Kate Luchini, formerly of the Lynn Museum and Peabody Essex Museum, as the director of StudioXL, Studio for Experiential Learning. This position is grant funded for two years, during which time Luchini, with guidance from an advisory group, will build the academic programming, community relationships and financial support.

According to Montserrat’s Dean of Faculty and Academic Affairs Laura Tonelli, “Kate impressed the search committee with her entrepreneurial spirit and vision for StudioXL, and with her strong record of accomplishment at PEM and the Lynn Museum; both involved work in experiential learning, building community partnerships and fundraising.  Kate’s familiarity with the North Shore will be an asset as well.”

The generous grant from the Davis Educational Foundation recognized Montserrat College of Art’s creative teaching style, developed by the college’s academic leadership team, which emphasizes learning that is interdisciplinary, team-taught and project-based.

Last spring the Davis Foundation announced that Montserrat would receive a $150,000 grant over two years for the Gateway project, which emphasizes this experiential teaching style.

The grant will provide funding for two new programs that serve, respectively, as gateways into and out of college. Funding will support the two parts of the Gateway Initiative, including: planning, implementation, outcome assessment and, creation of curricular models (best practices, guidelines, handbooks, documentation, templates, online resources) for future use.

Montserrat College of Art President Steve Immerman said, “Montserrat recognizes the need to go beyond the traditional classroom structure to introduce experiences that relate directly to those students will encounter in their professional lives. We are grateful to the Davis Foundation for providing this opportunity to offer new teaching methods to Montserrat students.”

1.  FX (the Freshman Experience)

Offered to freshman in the first semester, FX serves as a gateway from high school into college. The course is team-taught, interdisciplinary, and integrates studio practice with historical and cultural analysis. Methodologies from studio art and liberal arts (particularly art history) are combined to provide a holistic introduction to the visual arts while helping students to acclimate to college-level academic and studio work. This combination of rich content and tactile experience is designed to fully engage students as visual learners. The aim is to break down preconceptions about art, art making, and contemporary studio practice.

This 3-credit course features a closely coordinated series of lectures, museum/gallery/studio visits, research, writing, class discussions, team-based and individual projects. Small group meetings for discussion, research, and studio immersion complement three keystone lectures and field trips to the Peabody Essex Museum, Mass MOCA and New York City. The course is designed to function in the way that artists interact with the world, across disciplines at the intersections of research, writing, collaborating, current culture, and making.

2.  StudioXL (the Studio for Experiential Learning)

StudioXL serves as a gateway out of college and into the professional world. It provides students with a series of carefully structured opportunities, offered outside the traditional classroom/studio, that build skills such as team-work, collaboration,  project management, and working between disciplines in real world settings.  Some, if not all projects, will have community partners, bolstering our relationships with the local and regional businesses and community-based organizations that fuel the creative economy of the North Shore.

The enormously successful pilot project in StudioXL was a team-taught collaboration with Footprint Power at Salem Harbor Station. Montserrat structured it a course called Across the Bridge: Three Perspectives, it combined fieldwork, research and art making. Students examined and documented the decommissioning of the coal-powered Salem Harbor Power Plant, now Footprint Power, which funded the project. Thirty students guided by three faculty members developed a visual and narrative legacy of the plant and the community of people who worked there, through writings, paintings, photography and video, sculpture and installation, and design. The project culminated in an exhibition in the turbine hall in June 2014 that was seen by more than 1000 visitors; it concluded with an evening poetry reading among the turbines, which was organized by the director of the Impossible Places Poetry Tour. That night the turbines sounded for the last time and the dismantling began the following day.

The second StudioXL project for fall 2014 is a course called Food and Culture. In contrast to the power plant project, this course was initiated in-house; it combines cultural history, research into food economies and politics, resulting in the production of creative work. Among the local partners are the Food Project and Beverly Bees.

More collaborations are being planned for future semesters. For more information about this grant, please contact Montserrat College of Art’s Dean of Faculty and Academic Affairs Laura Tonelli at laura.tonelli@montserrat.edu or 978.921.4242 x 1601.


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Faculty News: Masako Kamiya and Diane Ayott join Artrageous!29 Featured Artist Bill Thompson in Exhibit at UNH

2014-12-22 15_34_43-Exhibit Invitation and Information - elizabeth.gianino@montserrat.edu - MontserrThe Physicality of Color: Jan. 23 – March 29, 2015
Curated by Director, Kristina Durocher
Museum of Art, University of New Hampshire at Durham
Paul Creative Arts Center, 30 Academic Way, Durham, NH
Opening reception: Friday, Jan. 23, 2015, 6 – 8 pm
cola.unh.edu/moa

The artists selected for this exhibition use color as the subject or subtext of their work, each exploring color tactilely, symbolically to define space as well as physical presence, or formally to create the illusion of space. From a variety of media and artistic practices, viewers are provided multiple entry points to consider artists’ choices. Exhibiting artists include: Diane Ayott, Carlos Jiménez Cahua, Catherine Evans, Masako Kamiya, Catherine Kehoe, Keira Kotler, Paul McMullan, Laura Moriarty, Lynn Richardson, Victor Schrager, Nancy Murphy Spicer, Matt Rich and Bill Thompson, who is also the Featured Artists at this year’s Artrageous!29 Auction Party on March 28, 2015. Learn more at auction.montserrat.edu.

Top images: (left) Gerda Peterich (1906-1974) , Central Park Strollers, 1939-46, gelatin silver print, 6.375” x 6.375”, Collection of the Museum of Art, UNH, Gift of Ms. Lily Hoffman, 1977.1.61; (right) Nancy Murphy Spicer, Biking In Berlin, 12, 2010, flashe, gouache, collage on guidebook page.

MUSEUM HOURS: Mon, Tue, Wed: 10 am – 4 pm, Thu: 10 am – 8 pm, Sat, Sun: 1 – 5 pm, Closed Fridays & University holidays.

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Diane Ayott, “Counting # 18″, acrylic on paper, 8.5 X 8.5″, 2013

Water Dressing, 2014

Masako Kamiya, “Water Dressing”, 2014

www.masakokamiya.com


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North Shore Game Jam @ Montserrat Jan. 23 – 25, 2015

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Instead of playing games all weekend MAKE GAMES at the North Shore Game Jam hosted by Montserrat!

Montserrat College of Art is hosting the 1st ever North Shore Game Jam in conjunction with the Global Game JamThe 32 hour weekend event (sleep encouraged from midnight to 9am Friday and Saturday nights) will take place from 5pm Friday, January 23rd thru 7pm Sunday, January 25th, 2015 on the 2nd & 3rd floor of the Hardie Building at Montserrat College of Art, 23 Essex Street, Beverly.

All levels of game developers are welcome from the merely curious to the very experienced. You don’t need to have designed a game before and you don’t need to like programming. Various assets and skills are essential like writing, art, animation, sound, and level design. Teams need a mix of people with various backgrounds and experience. You can come to the jam with your team in place or we will help you find a team to work with based on your particular skills and interests. 

There will be time to work on homework in-between game development sprints.

Learn more @ nsgamejam.com or contact blyth.hazen@montserrat.edu

Global Game Jam is the premier annual game creation event that fosters the development of innovative game concepts and promotes international collaboration and teamwork. GGJ brings together thousands of game development enthusiasts participating through many local jams around the world on a single weekend. GGJ has proven itself to be an incubator for creative experiments and new start-ups. Some of the successes have included games being published and exciting collaboration opportunities for participants.

Entrance Fee: None, this event is free and open to the public

The schedule for the event:

Friday, Jan. 23, 5 pm – midnight
     Intro – Info Sessions group creation
     Keynote Speaker Joe Mirabello @ 6:30 pm
Saturday, Jan. 24, 10 am – midnight
    Workday
Sunday, Jan., 25, 10 am – 7 pm
   Workday, Wrap-up & Presentations start @ 3pm

Who Can Participate: Pe-registration required for off campus participants, space priority given to students and alumni, Must be 18+

Learn more @ eventbrite.com/e/north-shore-game-jam-2015

23 Essex Street, Beverly, MA

Keynote: Joe Mirabello started making game art in 1996 by making custom levels in DFuse for Dark Forces and now he makes game art for a living. He’s contributed to five shipped titles, indie games, mass market novels, and Smithsonian documentaries. Joe has given lectures at colleges, moderated industry forums, spoken on industry panels, and written online tutorials. He recently wrote a novel, called the Armpit of Evil, which you can read a preview of and/or purchase here. Currently Joe is working on an indie game called Tower of Guns, which you can follow the development of here.


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Alumni News: Taylor Clough ’14 & Sarah Krizon ’13 Exhibit at Mingo Gallery

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Montserrat College of Art alumnae Taylor Clough ’14 and Sarah Krizon ’13 are exhibiting at Mingo Gallery this winter in their very own show, HEAVY STILL: New work by Taylor Clough & Sarah Krizon. Please show your support and stop by for the Opening Reception Saturday, January 24, 5 – 8 pm. This exhibit is not one to be missed! HEAVY STILL will remain on view January 13 – February 21.

Taylor Clough graduated with a BFA in Painting from Montserrat College of Art in 2014. Taylor’s painting, “Couch” was a top seller in last year’s Artrageous!28 live auction. She currently creates acrylic paintings that explore bold colors, shape and space through recognizable objects and interiors. Each painting goes through its own intimate process of combining representation and abstraction, but they all share a physicality of paint and moments of reflection.

Sarah Krizon graduated with a BFA in Painting from Montserrat College of Art in 2013. One of Sarah’s works on paper started an infamous bidding war in the Artrageous!26 live auction. She now creates works that depict figurative scenes with both oil paint and drawn charcoal line. Her narratives are painted, erased and re-drawn to create a sense of movement across the canvas.

Mingo Gallery & Custom Framing
284 Cabot St, Beverly, MA
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SEVEN |||: A Performative Drawing Project Returns

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 AUGUST VENTIMIGLIA | KENJI NAKAYAMA | SAMANTHA FIELDS | CHRISTOPHER MIR | ADAM MILLER | MARK HOFFMANN | NADIA WESTCOTT

Montserrat College of Art Galleries has invited seven artists to draw directly onto the seven walls of Montserrat Gallery over the course of seven weeks. Highlighting the ways the artists’ bodies and gestures activate the gallery space, this project celebrates the performative aspects of drawing and the individual nature of each artist’s process. SEVEN challenges traditional definitions of drawing, inviting artists of to mark-make in a variety of disciplines including performance, video and textile.

The gallery will act as an open studio over the course of each artist’s week-long residency, students and guests are welcome to come in.

January 12 – 16: August Ventimiglia
Opening Reception Friday, January 16, 7 – 9 pm

January 19 – 23: Kenji Nakayama
Opening Reception Friday, January 23, 7 – 9 pm

January 26 – 30: Samantha Fields
Opening Reception Friday, January 30, 7 – 9 pm

February 2 – 6: Christopher Mir
Opening Reception Friday, February 6, 7 – 9 pm

February 9 – 13: Adam Miller
Opening Reception Friday, February 13, 7 – 9 pm

February 16 – 20: Mark Hoffmann
Opening Reception Friday, January 20, 7 – 9 pm

February 23 – 27: Nadia Westcott
Opening Reception Thursday, February 26, 7 – 9 pm

Montserrat Galleries
23 Essex St, Beverly, MA

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2015 Alumni Show & Founders Exhibition Weekend Jan. 17 & 18

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ANNUAL ALUMNI SHOW

Montserrat College of Art’s Annual Alumni Show will open with a public reception on Sat., Jan. 17 from 4-7 pm in the 301 Cabot St. Gallery. The show will be on exhibit through Jan. 21, 2015.

The exhibition features works of art created by more than fifty alumni. From recently graduated to established artists and curators; the alumni featured find themselves in various stages of their careers, looking towards the future. This multi-disciplinary exhibition is a reunion of sorts, bringing alumni of all ages and from all across the country together to bond over shared experiences as artists.

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Heather Rose Anair ’06, Christine April ’14, Andrew Bablo ’07, Michelle Behre ’14, Clara Bohen ’11, Paula Borsetti ’97, Peter Brefini ’07, Erika Buschmann ’07, Brian Call ’85, Kathryn Chalmers ’04, Mori Clark ’12, Alyssa Coffin ’14, Alex Comfort ’13, Dan DeRosato ’14, Joe Lovasco ’07, Michael Concepcion Velez ’14, Sara Benson ’13, Kevin Duffy ’77, Richard Dolan ’09, Loren Doucette ’13, Suzy Evans ’13, Rosy Farnan ’11, Michael Fletcher ’91, Emma Johnson ’05, George Frary III ’00, Aubrey Gauthier ’14, Ania Gruca ’14, Kate Guillette ’03, Alex Gurney ’14, Amanda Halsdorff ’07, Jill Hedrick ’14, Molly Hoisington ’05, Andrew Houle ’00, Nicole Kircher ’01, Brett Mason ’12, Meg Mason ’74, Tammy Picone Nohelty ’92, Anthony Palocci Jr. ’09, Richard Pawlak ’81, Kristine Roan ’11, Rachel Schmidt ’01, Meaghan Sorce ’07, Janet Souza ’01, Benjamin Stebbings ’07, Christopher Stepler ’09, Chelsea Stewart ’14, Larissa Tapler ’13, Dorothy Tribeman ’07, Haley Vessey ’14, Cory Wasnewsky ’14, Cynthia Woehrle ’93, Alyssa Watters ’07, Martha Stone ’80, Olivia Boi ’13.

Above photos by Michelle Behre, Class of 2014

The following day, an opening reception will be held for a Montserrat College of Art Founders Exhibition at the Rocky Neck Cultural Center, 6 Wonson St., Gloucester, Sunday, Jan. 18, 10 am to noon. Each of the college’s founders will be represented in this exhibit. The public is welcome.

The Rocky Neck Art Colony is pleased to present a special Montserrat College of Art Founders Exhibition honoring the work of its founding faculty. This show, comprising a wide variety of approaches includes the paintings, sculpture, mixed media, and photography of its eight founders (six now deceased). These noted New England artists, most of whom called Cape Ann their home, include: painters Oliver Balf, George Gabin, Joseph Jeswald, and Roger Martin; sculptor Ray Pisano; mixed media artists Paul Scott and Dennis Sweeney; and photographer Vincent Varvaro.

This is a rare opportunity to experience the widely lauded work of these extraordinary artists and teachers whose creative vision included founding an institution dedicated to cultivating emerging young artists whose work may celebrate the visual arts for generations to come. All are invited. Admission, refreshments and nearby parking are free.

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Montserrat’s Founders Exhibit at Rocky Neck: Jan. 18, 2015

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Montserrat College of Art is an institution known as a place of inspiration, respect and encouragement where students can simultaneously develop their talents and achieve their visions of the future. Founded in the late sixties by eight bold-thinking artists, Montserrat was a new kind of art school that focused not only on the arts, but on the individual needs of each student as well. It was the combination of these two factors that, during a time of questioning the status quo and seeking new solutions, made the school revolutionary. As part of Montserrat College of Art’s Alumni Weekend, the Rocky Neck Art Colony is pleased to host a special Founders Exhibit to honor the work of the founding faculty.

This show, comprising a wide variety of approaches includes the paintings, sculpture, mixed media, and photography of its eight founders (six now deceased). These noted New England artists, most of whom called Cape Ann their home, include: painters Oliver BalfGeorge GabinJoseph Jeswald and Roger Martinsculptor Ray Pisano; mixed media artists Paul Scott and Dennis Sweeney; and photographer Vincent Varvaro. This is a rare opportunity to experience the widely lauded work of these extraordinary artists and teachers whose creative vision included founding an institution dedicated to cultivating emerging young artists whose work may celebrate the visual arts for generations to come. 

Montserrat College of Art Founders Exhibition will open with a reception on Sunday, Jan. 18, 10 am – noon, 6 Wonson St., Gloucester, MA. All are invited. Admission, refreshments and nearby parking are free. The exhibit will remain on view through Jan. 25.

Learn more about Montserrat’s Founding Faculty @ www.montserrat.edu/about/history

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Where Creativity Works for Alyssa Watters ’07

alyssa 1“The skills I learned and developed at Montserrat were the start of a great career path for me. I developed my own aesthetic, which became my brand, but also learned the basics of entrepreneurship, and now my business sells in gift shops in seven states.”

Alyssa Watters ‘07 is the definition of an entrepreneurial artist. She has been running her own company, artbyalyssa, in Beverly, since 2008. She contacts shops throughout the country to wholesale her products, attends craft fairs, runs her own solo fairs and art shows, along with the day-to-day business responsibilities. Since graduating, Watters has managed a stationary and gift shop in Hamilton, where she designed many of their print products. After working there for more than three years, she decided to combine her ‘real life’ education with the knowledge she gained from Montserrat, to create her own business, alyssawatters.com.

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Montserrat Commencement Speakers Exhibit at MOMA

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The Museum of Modern Art’s major contemporary painting survey, “The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World” includes the work of two Montserrat College of Art commencement speakers: Julie Mehretu (above image) and Amy Sillman (below image). Laura Hoptman, the curator of the exhibition, was also a visiting speaker at Montserrat for the Senior Fine Arts Seminar in the 1997 – 1998 academic year. The exhibit is on view Dec. 14, 2014 – Apr. 5, 2015. Learn more at moma.org

MOMA SillmanFor Hoptman’s take on the exhibition, see her recent conversation with Art in America’s Jessica Dawson, visit artinamericamagazine.com.


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Where Creativity Works for Jeremy Schmidt ’03

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“Today I use the skills I honed at Montserrat to think creatively when problem solving and to appreciate how many different viewpoints people in my industry have.” 

Originally from Elmira New York, Jeremy Schmidt ’03 lives in Lynn with his girlfriend Katherine, their rabbit named Salem and their pug Hermione. Schmidt received his BFA from Montserrat College of Art in 2003 with a concentration in Sculpture. After spending five years managing the water and sewer departments in Chelsea, he became an Assistant Operations and Maintenance Manager at the environmental consulting firm Weston and Sampson.

Most of Schmidt’s time is spent working pursuing an MBA from UMass Lowell, but in his spare time he decorates his house by turning old vending machines into works of art. “I like to take non-traditional objects and rework them to turn them into something functional for the home,” said Schmidt 

“Over the years my work has gone from the abstract to more towards functionality. The work I created at Montserrat gave me a launching off point creativity-wise to be where I am today.” After finishing his MBA Schmidt plans to open a tattoo business in the North Shore area.

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Alumni News: Heather Reid ’07 Featured in North of Boston Magazine

NoBo-Masthead-2013-800x100-Finalized-ColorsHeather Reid Studios: Unconventional Creations with Illustration, Fine Art, & Photography

By Keith Spencer, North of Boston Magazine

A girl with a brush and a million dreams, Heather Reid is a self-described jack of arts, working out of her home studio in Salem and collaborating with numerous local arts organizations including Creative Salem.

Since graduating from Montserrat College of Art in 2007, Heather has been on an adventure to share her unconventional creations with the world, gathering much of her inspiration from the natural world.

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She loves spending her free time combing North of Boston beaches, walking the nature trails of the Ipswich River, and capturing the wildlife she often encounters in her own backyard. Her work has been presented in more than twenty recent exhibitions, magazine features, and news articles.

Heather’s artwork and jewelry are both subtle and striking, and would go great with nearly anyone’s decor or wardrobe. From photographs to jewelry to mixed media, her works are individually created by her in her home studio, and absolutely guarantees their quality.

If you make a purchase on her Etsy shop, all items are shipped in a plastic protective sheet with a cardboard backing to prevent bending, and sent in rigged cardboard envelopes or tubes to prevent potential damage. All photography is professionally printed on premium quality archival photo paper.

To learn more or purchase Heather’s work, visit:

Above image: © Heather Reid Studios. All Rights Reserved


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Faculty News: Rode Olson Exhibits at Susan Maasch Fine Art & Kingston Gallery

Copper Drake, 2014

Prof. Rose Olson will be participating in a group show of gallery artists at Susan Maasch Fine Art located at 4 City Center, Portland, ME. This exhibit is open Mon. – Sun., 10 am – 5 pm all through December, or by appointment 207-478-4087.  Please drop in when you are in the area, since the gallery will be continually rotating the work of all their artists. Learn more @ susanmaaschfineart.com Presently, Olson has a solo show of mainly small works at Kingston Gallery, 450 Harrison Ave, Boston. One of her 10 x 10 x 2″ paintings titled “Copper Drake” below,  will be included in this exhibit.

Regular gallery hours are Wed. – Sun., 12 – 5 pm or by appointment: 617-423-4113.

See more of Olson’s work @ www.roseolson.com


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Montserrat’s Art Education Practicum Exhibit 300 Hours Thesis Show Featuring Artwork by Local Elementary and High School Students

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Montserrat College of Art’s six Art Education Practicum graduates are showcasing the artwork created by their students from Danvers High School, Holten Richmond Middle School, Mission Hill School, Lawrence High School, Beverly High School, Wood End Elementary School and Birch Meadow Elementary School. The reception for 300 Hours: Art Education Thesis Exhibition was held Wed., Dec. 3 and will remain on view through Wed., Dec. 17 at the 301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA. The exhibit is open to the public Mon. - Fri., 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m., Sat., 12 – 5 p.m. and by appointment.

Montserrat’s practicum student artists (Left to Right) Haley Vessey, Carly Brasier, Kristen Karchonas, (Montserrat’s Chair of Art Education Assoc. Prof. Rébecca Bourgault), Bianca Picozzi, Kerry McDermott and Zoey Chapin exhibit the artworks produced by students in grades K through 12 from local elementary and high schools. They are committed to educating through the visual arts as a way of keeping young minds creative and inspired.

This annual celebration is demonstrative of the Montserrat Practicum students 300 hours of dedication to Art Education. The work featured in this exhibition is an intimate look at the time Practicum students have spent educating and supporting youth in public school systems while completing their Pre-K-12 Initial Licensure Requirements.

For more information contact Montserrat’s Chair of Art Education Assoc. Prof. Rébecca Bourgault at 978.921.4242 x 1605, rebecca.bourgault@montserrat.edu or visit www.montserrat.edu/galleries/301.

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Photo Cred: Terry Slater


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Freshman Experience Exhibit Opening December 5

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Wondering what FX has been up to? Please join our FX/Freshman Experience Class of 2018 for their Independent Final Projects and celebrate the opening of the exhibition of works on, of and about paper!

 

On view on the 2nd and 3rd Floors of Hardie: Dec. 5 – 10, 2014

 

Opening reception: Friday, Dec. 5, 2 – 3 pm


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Thank You for Participating in #GivingTuesday

Because of YOU Montserrat is pleased to celebrate another successful

This year 49 generous donors contributed more than $4,300, almost a 600% increasein funds and double the number of contributors in 2013!

Every dollar contributed helps to support financial aid for Montserrat students. Your generosity makes you a silent partner in their success. Thank you!


     
Make #GivingTuesday part of your holiday tradition.
Mark your calendars now for #GivingTuesday 2015 on December 1st, 2015!
  

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Montserrat Trustee Olivia Parker to Exhibit at Robert Klein Gallery

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Montserrat College of Art Trustee Olivia Parker is exhibiting in two solo shows this winter at Robert Klein Gallery in Boston.

STILL/LIFE
ROBERT KLEIN GALLERY
38 Newbury St. Boston
Opening Reception: Sat., Dec. 13, 2 – 5 pm
Artist talk at 3:30 pm
RSVP on FACEBOOK
On View: Dec. 13, 2014 – Jan. 31, 2015
Hours: Tue. – Fri., 10 am – 5:30 pm,
Sat., 11 am – 5 pm

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ROBERT KLEIN GALLERY @ ARS LIBRI
500 Harrison Ave. Boston
Opening Reception: Fri., Dec. 5, 5:30 – 7:30 pm
On View: Dec. 5 – 27, 2014
Hours: Mon. – Fri., 9 am – 6 pm, Sat., 11 am – 5 pm

Robert Klein Gallery is pleased to announce its seventh solo show of photographs by Montserrat College of Art Trustee Olivia Parker. This is an exhibition in two parts, with The Eye’s Mind at ROBERT KLEIN GALLERY @ ARS LIBRI (500 Harrison Ave) opening this Friday, Dec. 5, and Still/Life at ROBERT KLEIN GALLERY (38 Newbury St) opening on Saturday, Dec. 13.

In a press release for Parker’s 1993 show at the gallery, Animal, Vegetable, Mineral and Something Else, Robert Klein said: “When viewing Olivia’s photographs, one feels like he or she is participating in a dream. Her carefully constructed still lifes are at the same time eerie, yet illuminating. One experiences the delicate illusion of objects on the verge of change — a movement from the past to the future, yet within the boundaries of a still life.”

Twenty years after that exhibition, Parker’s still lifes continue to grow and change. In Still/Life at Robert Klein Gallery, images of shells, flowers, and bugs crackle with life against shadowy figures and blurred backgrounds; consciousness and subconsciousness play together on the same page. As Parker says, these “objects of comfort and despair” serve as reminders that life and death are inseparable.

At Robert Klein Gallery @ Ars Libri, The Eye’s Mind presents Parker’s consideration of the relationship between visual and verbal thinking. Featuring By the Book, a steel sculpture Parker crafted in 2014, and several of her book-based images, this unique installation is contextualized by the formidable libraries housed at Ars Libri, the rare and out-of-print book dealer that has served as Robert Klein Gallery’s satellite exhibition space since 2012.

Parker’s limited edition, self-published book, Still/Life, will be available for purchase at both gallery locations. More information about this two-part solo show will be announced soon.

Questions? Email inquiry@robertkleingallery.com

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Art Education Thesis Exhibit “300 Hours” Reception Dec. 3

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Opening & Graduation Reception: Wed., Dec. 3, 5 – 8 pm

On view: Dec. 1 – 17, 2014

301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA

 

The artists Carly Brasier, Zoey Chapin, Kristen Karchonas, Kerry McDermott, Bianca Picozzi and Haley Vessey are proud to present the artworks of students representing Danvers High School, Holten Richmond Middle School, Mission Hill School, Lawrence High School, Beverly High School, Wood End Elementary School and Birch Meadow Elementary School, on behalf of the Art Education Program at Montserrat College of Art. The students are committed to educating through the visual arts as a way of keeping young minds creative and inspired.
 
This annual celebration is demonstrative of the Practicum students 300 hours of dedication to Art Education. The work featured in this exhibition is an intimate look at the time Practicum students have spent educating and supporting youth in public school systems while completing their Pre-K-12 Initial Licensure Requirements.
 
Join us in a ceremony with refreshments and the presentation of Certificates of Completion to the artists on Wed., Dec. 3, 5-8pm at the 301 Gallery: 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA.

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Faculty News: Kelly Murphy Wins 2014 Society of Illustrators 57th Annual Competition

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Asst. Prof. Kelly Murphy‘s cover illustration for Ship of Dolls (written by Shirley Parenteau and published by Candlewick Press) is a winner in the Society of Illustrators57th Annual Competition!

Discover her illustrations for this project and learn more on the book’s project page.
Murphy’s work has been featured in curated shows, gallery exhibitions and international magazines specialized in illustration. By the end of 2011, her nineteenth book will have been released. 2011 was a prolific year with releases in the novelty and gift market, three published children’s books, and several foreign translations of her books. 
 
More of her work can be seen on her website www.kelmurphy.com

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Alumni News: Loren Doucette ’13 Performs in Gloucester Nov. 22

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Montserrat College of Art alumna Loren Doucette ’13 is included in the group event Dance in Dialogue on Saturday November 22, 7:30 pm, at Trident Gallery,189 Main St. Gloucester, MA.

Dance in Dialogue features two original performance works, followed by conversation and refreshments.  Free, donations encouraged.  Space is limited so please reserve a seat at events@tridentgallery.com or by calling 978-491-7785.

Loren Doucette (visual artist) and Sarah Slifer Swift (dancer) will show a segment of their collaborative project “Unravelling,” to be premiered in full in early 2015.  The piece explores the building of a framework within which a relationship is contextualized.  Through dance and visual art created in the live moment, they inhabit the possibilities of unravelling the self from the frame.

Kate Tarlow Morgan (dancer/writer) recently returned from a midwest pilgrimage to bury her father’s ashes with a dramatic story of relatives unknown to her. She will report this intense personal story with the aid of artifacts, photographs, and a movement score created especially for the walls of Trident Gallery.

Doucette lives and works as an active member of the arts community in Gloucester, MA. Her paintings and drawings have shown in solo and group exhibitions on the North Shore regularly since 2006. She received a BFA in Drawing and Painting in 2013 from Montserrat College of Art. In 2011, Loren participated in Montserrat’s study-abroad program in Viterbo, Italy where she further intensified her fascination with landscape painting. Her work is currently installed at her showroom and studio on One Center Street in Gloucester, MA.


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Alumni News: Michael Grimaldi ’05 Exhibits at Joshua Liner Gallery in New York

unnamedMontserrat College of Art alumnus Michael Grimaldi ’05 is exhibiting in Your Favorite Artist’s Favorite Artist Group Exhibition at Joshua Liner Gallery in New York, NY.

 Reception: Thu., Nov. 20, 6 – 8 pm
On view through Dec. 20, 2014
Joshua Liner Gallery
540 West 28th St.
New York, NY
 
Gallery Hours

Tue. – Sat. 11 am – 6 pm

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Learn more @ joshualinergallery.com


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Montserrat Students Propose Beverly Wall that Draws Artists From All Over

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By  | GLOBE CORRESPONDENT   NOVEMBER 17, 2014

BEVERLY — A graffiti mural that began as a response to the growing problem of obscene messages scrawled upon a prominent wall has become a local institution with a national and even international following.

In the process, this wall at the Clemenzi Industrial Park has also become one of just a few spaces in the region where graffiti is officially sanctioned, which may help protect nearby walls from unwanted images and messages.

John Clemenzi, who manages the property that his family has owned for four decades, said that when he began allowing artists to paint on the building’s rear wall, Beverly was in the midst of “a horrible graffiti problem.” But in recent years, he said, “I rarely if at all see any graffiti elsewhere in the city.”

“If. . . there’s very little of it, it’s because they have a place to go and do it legally instead of tagging somebody else’s private property and ending up in jail if they get caught,” Clemenzi, 60, said in a telephone interview Sunday.

The change began about a dozen years ago, when two Montserrat College of Art students approached Clemenzi with a proposal to decorate the wall, which faces the tracks for the Newburyport/Rockport commuter rail line.

Clemenzi had grown frustrated with the frequent repainting necessary to cover up profane and often sexist messages that were routinely painted on the wall, so he agreed to let the young artists decorate a small section, 40 feet of what he estimates is a total length of about 800 feet.

He set three ground rules: Clean up after yourselves, no offensive messages, and don’t paint on the building’s brick faces. The students agreed to follow those rules and to help police the area, and over time, the sanctioned graffiti grew to cover the wall.

“I’d be struggling if you gave me oil and canvas and brushes and lessons, and these guys do this with a half a dozen spray cans,” he said. The wall has become well known among graffiti artists, Clemenzi said, drawing painters from New York, Florida, California — even France. Some of the work has even impressed Clemenzi, who admits he was not immediately a fan of graffiti art.

Click here to read the full article on The Boston Globe!


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Artist Talk with Ariel Freiberg Nov. 19

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Ariel Freiberg, Earth’s Touch, 2014, acrylic and oil on linen

Ariel Freiberg‘s installation Earth’s Touch is currently on view in the Frame 301 Gallery through Wednesday, December 17, 2014. Join Ariel Freiberg for a Public Artist Talk where she will discuss her recent work and share her artistic practice.Freiberg’s Installation for the Frame 301 Gallery portrays a vignette of a face, paired with a veil, which refers to the coalescing of deep psychological sensory experience. The ambiguity between the edges of ripped faces and the bedrock ground are reminders of the uncertainties of our physical world.

Artist Talk with Ariel Freiberg

Wed., Nov. 19, 11:30 am

23 Essex Street, Room 201

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Frame 301 is the street side window exhibition space located at 301 Cabot Street. The space is presented to the public through expansive storefront windows that face the road, and encourages large-scale, site-specific works from emerging and established local, regional and national artists. Frame 301′s exhibitions change every 4-6 weeks and it is a unique space encouraging installations that encompass the entirety of the space and completely transform it. The Frame 301 is partially supported by a grant from The Beverly Cultural Council.

For more information visit www.montserrat.edu/galleries/public-programs/


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

The Cabot Reopens & Montserrat Commencement Returns to the Cinema

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Montserrat College of Art is excited to welcome The Cabot back to the neighborhood! We are looking forward to seeing the infamous marquee lights back on for the re-opening this weekend! For more on The Cabot Theater, including its program calendar and ticket sales, visit thecabot.org

Also, it is official! Montserrat will once again be having graduation ceremonies back at the Cabot Street Cinema this coming May!

The new ownership group includes Bertolon, architect Thaddeus Siemasko with local firm Siemasko + Verbridge, Beverly Bank Board of Directors Chairman William Howard, Chianti Tuscan Restaurant owner Rich Marino and Cinema Salem owner Paul Van Ness. The group is currently working to get nonprofit status through the IRS, Siemasko said. The theater was sold by past owner David Bull to local entrepreneur Henry Bertolon for $1.2 million on Oct. 16 after a sale being in the works for about a year, Bertolon said.

The front rows of seats in front of the stage will be removed to add a flat floor surface ideal for dancing — or mosh pits, in the case of hard-rock concerts, Siemasko said.

“We’re trying to make this place used in any way people can imagine it,” Siemasko said.

The first movies will be played this weekend. Drafthouse Films’ “20,000 Days On Earth” will play Friday at 4:30 p.m., and “Mood Indigo” will play at 7:30 p.m. The two movies will also play Saturday with their start times reversed. Dec. 6 will see the first official music performance at The Cabot Theater, headlined by local bands Exit 18 and Something In Common.

Content Courtesy of The Salem News, read the full article at salemnews.com


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Will Barnet’s New Book Highlights Artist’s Beverly Paintings Exhibited at Montserrat

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Will Barnet’s career took him from Beverly to the heights of the art world.

By Will Broaddus, Staff writer November 5, 2014

The painter and printmaker taught for many years at the Arts Students League in New York and was awarded a National Arts Medal in 2012, not long before he died at the age of 101.

But Barnet traveled home over the years to see his family, and some of his most powerful work drew from his roots on the North Shore. A visit he made to his sister in 1990 resulted in a group of paintings that are analyzed in a new book, “My Father’s House, On Will Barnet’s Painting” by Thomas Dumm.

“He was actually checking in on Eva, as he was wont to do,” said Dumm, a professor of political ethics at Amherst College.

Eva was 11 years older than Barnet, the youngest of his three siblings, in a family that had left Russia in 1906.

She lived alone in the family home at 7 Pierce Ave. following the deaths of her parents and her sister Jeanette, who, like Eva, never married.

“He felt obligated to check on her. She was ill, suffering from a fever, but she was also declining,” said Dumm, adding that she was talking to deceased members of the family in his presence.

That led Barnet to create nine paintings between 1990 and 1995 that focused on Eva’s haunted existence in the house in Beverly.

“The paintings are dramatic; some might even say tragic,” Dumm writes in his introduction. “In a strange way the series is a family album.”

Most of the paintings depict Eva inside the house, staring toward an unspecified source of light, while the rest of the room is filled with shadows. She is typically touching her face with one or both of her hands, an anxious gesture that Dumm discusses, while one or more deceased family members occupies the darkness.

“I never asked Will specifically the order in which he painted the paintings,” Dumm said, but he does know that the first was “The Dream.”

Dumm first met Barnet when the artist donated “The Dream” to Mead Museum at Amherst College, as part of a bequest in which each of the nine paintings were given to different colleges in New England.

“The idea was and is that these colleges and universities, as a condition for taking the paintings, would publicize the fact that they are a group,” Dumm said. “In the case of Amherst College, a Web page is devoted to the whole series of paintings in the Mead archives.”

Four of the paintings appeared at Beverly’s Montserrat College of Art in October and November of 2004 in an exhibit curated by Katherine French, the gallery director at the time. She had approached the artist about doing a show, and Barnet suggested using the paintings that focus on Eva and the house on Pierce Avenue.

“This body of work had been shown once at a gallery in New York,” French said. “He felt it was given short shrift. It wasn’t abstract and not his prints — not what he was known for.”

Like Dumm’s book, the Montserrat exhibit borrowed its title from another one of the nine paintings, “My Father’s House,” which depicts the front of the house and the ghostly figure of Eva, who is standing behind a screen door.

“I chose to tell the story of his familial connection to this particular house,” said French, who is now director at Danforth Art in Framingham. “I showed a selection of paintings and drawings with that story.”

Where the exhibit focused on Barnet’s creative process and his earlier connections to Beverly, Dumm’s book searches for the universal significance in his paintings.

“My sense is that in exploring both the family and how it has been figured and configured by the artist, we may learn more about our own condition now,” Dumm writes, “something of the state of our relationships to each other and ourselves and the predicaments we find ourselves facing in a time of turbulence and trouble.” 

After interviewing Barnet in front of an audience at Amherst in 2009, Dumm struck up a friendship with the painter, and they discussed several plans for a book about his art.

“We probably met 10 or 11 times in person, and he would always have me lunch with him,” Dumm said. “But we spoke on the phone every couple of weeks. I spoke to him the day before he died.”

He eventually focused on this series of paintings because they echoed so many themes in his own work, which includes a study of loneliness.

“The more you think about it, the more you dive into it, the more things you see,” Dumm said. “I’m astonished by the whole series.”

Courtesy of The Salem News

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Gallery Update: “SHEER PANIC” Senior Thesis Exhibition

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SHEER PANIC: Senior Thesis Exhibition
ReceptionWed., Nov. 12, 5 – 8 pm
Exhibit Dates: November 10 – 14, 2014
Hours: Mon. – Fri. 11:30 am – 1:30 pm & 4 – 6 pm
Location: 301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA

SHEER PANIC, is a cross discipline show, featuring the work of Montserrat College of Art graduating seniors Joanna Carey (Haverhill, MA), Keisuke Eguchi (Kanagawa, Japan), Casandra LaFlamme (Beverly, MA), Allison Myers (Boston, MA), Ivy Neff (Cambridge, MA), Amy Titus (Groveland, MA), and Chelbi Wade (Westbrook, CT).

The show incorporates paintings, drawings, and sculptures. SHEER PANIC features large scale work, collections, and installations, in which the viewer can be transported into a different way of seeing. Much of the work encourages looking closer at the world around us, whether this be in relation to nature, political issues, or everyday subjects. Many of the artists’ work draws influence from nature’s beauty and details, such as types of growth.

Photo Cred: Joanna Carey ’15

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Alumni Update: Lana Wheeler ’12

Lana Wheeler starts her designs on paper and then moves to the computer. She particularly loves drawing and illustrating.

Lana Wheeler starts her designs on paper and then moves to the computer. She particularly loves drawing and illustrating.

Maine Designer Finds Inspiration and Connection in Portland’s Lively Art Scene

By Kristin D’Agostino

Being in art school offers artists a close connection to a creative community. But, what happens after graduation? For Lana Wheeler moving to Portland, Maine a lively city with a bustling art scene has

Wheeler created this soap label for a client in Maine.

Wheeler created this soap label for a client in Maine.

helped her stay inspired and connected to fellow artists. The graphic design major moved home to Maine after graduating in 2012 and says living in a funky seaside city has been great for her career. She has built up steady work as a freelance designer, working with clients ranging from brides-to-be to a local app company where she designs animation and typography for video games.

It seems the salty air is good for the soul. “I grab most of my inspiration being outdoors,” Wheeler says. “I like to get ideas from architecture, trees and nature.”

Since graduating, Wheeler has explored many areas of design and has specialized in logo creation and company branding. She hopes to find work in the future at a small studio or design firm where she can be part of a creative team.

In the meantime, she is taking advantage of Portland’s lively arts community, which includes and regular cultural events and open studios.

Her advice to grads: Stay connected - “A sense of community, connection and support means all the world after graduating.”


www.montserrat.edu

FREE YOGA on Tuesday & Friday

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Montserrat has been holding FREE weekly Yoga sessions in the 248 Cabot Building (Room 208). The last three classes are as follows:

Friday, Nov. 14: 8 am – 8:45 am
Tuesday, Nov. 18: 11:25 am – 12:15 pm
Friday, Nov. 21: 8 am – 8:45 am

All levels welcome and no experience necessary. This is Hatha Yoga, Flow & Basics style. Beneficial for health, energy, focus, circulation, mood, balance, creativity, brain & well-being to name a few of the benefits!

Bring a mat if you have one, some extras provided & for other questions email instructor maura@innersourcewellness.com


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Alumni News: Carly Brasier ’14 Exhibits at Beverly’s Atomic Cafe

10422908_545106612287580_2983350896971931545_nMontserrat College of Art painting alumna Carly Brasier ’14 has her paintings and sculptures on display at Atomic Cafe in Beverly for the month of November.

Make sure to check out her work at 265 Cabot Street next time you’re in downtown Beverly for a hot cup o’ Joe!

See more of her work at www.carlybrasier.com

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Montserrat Students Exhibit at Crane Estate November 8

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Montserrat students will have their artwork on display across the sprawling the grounds of the Crane Estate for the annual Art Show and Sale. This is the fifth annual show at the Crane Estate in Ipswich presented by Montserrat’s Bear Gallery.

Saturday, Nov. 8 – 10, 10 am – 4 pm
Castle Hill on the Crane Estate
290 Argilla Road, Ipswich, MA

Admission is FREE and open to the public!

For more information contact The Trustees of Reservation at www.thetrustees.org or 978.356.4351.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact len.thomas-vickory@montserrat.edu


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Dan DeRosato ’14 & Jill Hedrick ’14 Exhibit During November First Fridays

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Alumnus Dan DeRosato ’14 and alumna Jill Hedrick ’14 will be exhibiting Parallel Frontiers  for one night only at Find & Form Space on Friday, November 7, 6 – 9 pm at 524 Harrison Ave. in Boston during Boston’s November First Fridays. The exhibit was curated by Montserrat Galleries’ Asst. Curator of Exhibitions Pam Campanaro.

“I’m very excited to have this opportunity to exhibit in Boston, and showcase some of my recent work,” said DeRosato.

Parallel Frontiers reveals the aesthetic likeness between two unlike methods of making.

“I’m excited for them both,” said Campanaro. “It’s a big step for each of them to showcase new work, and their first large exhibition post graduation.”

Parallel Frontiers expands the dimensionality of line in both digital and handmade practices. Line is an abstraction, perceived more than actually viewed. We cannot see a line’s infinite extension or its complete measure. We recognize its one dimension or “flatness”. DeRosato and Hedrick compositionally challenge these rules, making their work the exception.

DeRosato and Hedrick’s work intersect thematically commonly referencing themes of failure, instability and relationships. Layered (literally) with information and memory from appropriated data, they hijack the original and reconstruct it to tell person narratives. Materially, their work is parallel; DeRosato glitches data, a digital technique used to error images. The act of glitching is destructive in that it “breaks” an image revealing flaws, line interruption and random abstraction. Hedrick is more invested in the manipulation of something tangible, in her case photo clippings, to void a snapshot of its memory.

See more @ www.danderosato.com & www.jillhedrick.com

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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey

Alumni News: Bea Modisett ’07 Interview with Free People Writer Julie O’Boyle ’06

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Montserrat College of Art alumna Bea Modisett ’07 was interviewed by Free People writer and fellow alumna Julie O’Boyle ’06 for a recent feature on Free People‘s blog. Modisett reflects on how her time at Montserrat, living in Beverly and her travel experiences through Montserrat’s study abroad trips to Italy and Africa, have impacted her painting.

Richmond. A city that has certainly left an impression on me, and a city that I anticipate returning to. Not exactly top of mind when one imagines the great artistic hubs of the world, but that’s just another reason to love it.the full version.

Not boastful in its beauty, the artistic side of Richmond has a way of popping up unexpectedly. Turn a corner and you might find yourself face to face with one of the boldest murals you’ve ever seen, or glance skyward for a glimpse of a street artist’s wheat-paste masterpiece adorning the side of an old building. It’s only then that you might realize, this city is brimming with artistic flourish. Tucked away in one of those buildings is the painting studio of recent Richmond transplant Bea Modisett.

I’ve known Bea for a long time, first as a classmate at the small fine arts college we attended, and later, as a close friend and collaborator. She is easily one of the most driven and accomplished artists that I know, and a seasoned veteran of the road. Speak to her for ten minutes, and I can guarantee you’ll leave the conversation day dreaming of cross-country road trips and sojourns to Africa, India, and Thailand. The spaces and landscapes depicted in her varied body of work invite exploration, often eliciting vastly different reactions from those who view it. While in Richmond for our recent FP Me event, I had the opportunity to tour Modisett’s studio and talk about her travels, her art, and the challenges that come with being a full-time artist:

Could you tell me about your background?

“Well, I was born in Washington, DC, bounced back and forth between DC and Rhode Island as a child, finally settling in Rhode Island for high school. I attended a small fine arts college in Beverly, MA — Montserrat College of Art — which I graduated from in 2007. This past summer I relocated to Richmond, VA to attend Virginia Commonwealth University, where I’m working towards my Master’s.”

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Did you always want to be an artist?

“I remember, in the 3rd grade we made a yearbook, they took our picture and in this box they instructed us to draw what we wanted to be when we grew up; kids were drawing themselves as astronauts and doctors, I drew myself in a beret with a paintbrush.”

I imagined myself similarly as a kid — the artist in the beret with the easel and palette — how has your perception of what an artist is changed in recent years?

“I’m learning that artists have a huge responsibility and potentially a lot of power. It’s not just about me expressing myself – obviously it is, in a way — but I’m also realizing that as an artist you have a responsibility to try to make people understand that there are different ways of seeing and experiencing the world. My work isn’t political but you can see the power of artists who do political work. I’m recognizing that art can really shift perspectives. So I think it’s gone from my younger self being like, “I’m expressing myself and being an individual!” to feeling as if this is a legitimate tool that can do some good in the world.”

Travel is a big part of your life and your work, do you think your time spent moving back and forth between DC and Rhode Island as a child inspired your later wanderlust?

“Moving, sure, but it was also my parents. Our family vacations were unconventional — never Disneyland — we were always visiting historic battlefields or camping; my parents taught us that it’s important to move and to always be looking. So travel, to me, is me looking for something, searching for something, not necessarily home, but just searching, looking, exploring. I think it’s important to be exposed to everything this world has to offer. That can mean physical exploration, but also exploration within your own mind. Don’t just accept what surrounds you.”

Can you pinpoint a moment when your desire to travel went beyond those family vacations? A breakthrough moment when you realized that travel was going to become a huge part of your work?

“I went to Italy and Africa with Montserrat, which was incredible. Looking back on those experiences… they were pivotal but also felt a little surface. When I returned home, the patterns and the energy of the people I met all made their way into my painting. I painted the patterns of the dresses I saw women wearing, the patterns of the fabric. It wasn’t until I drove solo across the country — from Boston to San Francisco on a month-long journey — that’s when I felt a really incredible connection to traveling alone, to being in those landscapes, it was intense. I remember being like “Julie, I just want to get in my car and drive to California,” do you remember that? And then I did it! I planned my trip and I went.”

Knowing how often you moved and how much you crave travel and new experiences, it’s interesting that up until recently you were so firmly anchored in Beverly, MA. Can you tell me about the decision to stay there?

“The four years at Montserrat, I look at it as four years of building a community and after graduation I stayed with that community. I continued to cultivate relationships, which lead to opportunities. By staying in Beverly I was able to teach at the college, run a gallery, I was working for artists and showing my work. The community kept offering me support, and I was able to actively live as an artist because I had ties there. I knew it was time to go, though, when the painting wasn’t keeping me from feeling under-stimulated. Beverly is amazing — you know that — but I wanted to be surrounded by people who were devoting their lives to it. I needed that intensity around me.”

Do you have any advice for aspiring painters?

“I was taught that the only way you’re going to be really good at something, is if you do what you really want to do. Find a way to do it, don’t make excuses, and say yes to opportunities. And realize that you may have to make some sacrifices along the way.”

Click here to read the full version.


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Alumni News: Donna Baldassari ’83 and Marcia Hermann ’83 Exhibit at Ipswich’s Hall-Haskell House

10451703_10202831288211289_3507026389978155778_n (1)Montserrat College of Art alumnae Donna Baldassari ’83 and Marcia Hermann ’83, join Steve Negrón, Montserrat’s former director of admissions, for an exhibit at the Hall-Haskell House at 36 S Main Street in Ipswich. There will be an opening reception Friday, Nov. 7, 5 – 8 pm.

Exhibit Dates: November 5 – 9

Wed. – Sat. noon – 5 pm & Sun. noon – 4 pm

Donna Baldassari has been most recognized for her luminous landscapes.  As a child of the 50’s she embraces her love of nostalgia and has extended her portfolio to include quintessential painterly portraits of vintage bicycles and campers.  Summering in Wellfleet MA has provided the inspiration to capture the quiet beauty of simplicity, when life moved at a slower pace.  Baldassari is currently represented by the Bowersock Gallery in Provincetown MA and was featured in a Two Woman Show June 2013 entitled “Déjà Vu.  She is also represented by Chameleon Gallery of Newburyport, MA. www.donnabaldassari.com.

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Donna Baldassari, Go Green, 16”x12” oil on panel

Marcia Hermann: Originally from Speedway, Indiana, Marcia is known for her tongue-in-cheek vignettes of her kooky yet prosaic personal life.  She has recently been spending summers in Indiana with her niece Emily and Emily’s golden retriever, Tucker.  Not a natural pet lover, Marcia has been completely won over by Tucker, and he and Emily loom large in her recent paintings.  An award-winning painter, she is currently represented by Chameleon in Newburyport, MA. www.marciahermann.com.

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Marcia Hermann, I forgot which foot I licked. 30”x30” oil on panel

Steve Negrón’s paintings express desires, fears and mischievous intentions. “There are running themes in many of my paintings of intimacy, betrayal or something sinister about to happen.” A mild-mannered college administrator by day, he is otherwise found in his small home studio in Lynn.  Negrón is represented by Chameleon Gallery in Newburyport and was the featured artist in the October 2012 edition of North Shore Art*Throb Magazine.www.stevenegron.com.

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Steve Negrón, Pajama Party 16”x20” acrylic on panel


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Published by College Relations Intern Josh Ramsey