Internationally Known Animator Bryan Konietzko to Speak at 2014 Commencement Ceremonies

Graduation invite 2014

Montserrat College of Art announces internationally known Animator Bryan Konietzko as the 2014 Commencement Speaker and Honorary Degree Recipient. Mr. Konietzko will address the Montserrat community on May 16, 2014 at 10 am at the Dane Street Church, 10 Dane Street, Beverly.

Konietzko is a Peabody Award winning and Emmy nominated animation director, best known as the co-creator and executive producer of the animated series Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra. He has also worked as a character designer at Film Roman for Family Guy and as Assistant Director for Mission Hill and King of the Hill. He was a Storyboard Artist and Art Director for the Nickelodeon animated series Invader Zim. Konietzko earned a BFA degree in Illustration from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1998.

BryanKonietzko

 “We are extremely honored to have an artist of Mr. Konietzko’s caliber speaking to our graduates,” said Stephen D. Immerman, president of the college. “His successful career both in the US and abroad will be inspirational to our community. We are excited to welcome him to the campus and to the North Shore.”

The Class of 2014 has selected Asst. Prof. Shanth S. Enjeti to serve as the faculty speaker at commencement and Merriweather McCarty has been named student speaker.

Immediately following commencement, students and guests are invited to the Beverly Common, next to the Hardie Building, for an outdoor reception hosted by the Montserrat community. The Montserrat Gallery will be open for viewing of the 2014 All Senior Show at the college’s main campus building at 23 Essex Street.

For further information, contact Jo Broderick at jo.broderick@montserrat.edu or 978.867.9613.


www.montserrat.edu

2014 Senior Thesis Exhibition Dates

Montserrat College of Art’s seniors are hosting a series of weekly group exhibitions at Montserrat’s 301 Gallery, Mingo Gallery and Porter Mill this spring. Exhibit openings will be held every Wednesday (and a few Thursday) night, 5 – 8 pm, March 19 – May 7. The public is invited to see this cutting-edge work and talk to the students.

Each small group theme show will include the individual work of each artist, developed in the course of their studies toward their BFA degree. The shows are themed by the students’ concentrations and include illustration, fine arts, graphic design and animation. The fine arts shows include sculpture, painting, drawing, photography, printmaking and book arts.

Upcoming exhibition schedule:

Thesis Show: Fine Arts VIINumber 7
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Michael Concepcion Velez, Melissa Miranda, Mirek Kutnik, Melissa Tremblay, Massiel Grullón, Michelle Behre & Henry Long.
On View: Monday, April 21-Friday, April 25
Reception: Wednesday, April 23, 5 – 8 pm

1979498_10152414825118646_1637207369_n

Thesis Show: Animation- BUFFERING
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Elaine Carreiro, Amanda Furrh, Kristie Guerette, Merriweather McCarty, Michelle McGaughey & Samantha LeFrancois
On View: Monday, April 28 – Friday, May 2
Reception: Wednesday, April 30, 5 – 8 pm

1398992_10152306863255731_1087905215_o

Thesis Show: Fine Arts VIII - What they Are
Mingo Gallery, 284 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Dan DeRosato & Cory Wasnewsky
On View: April 29 – May 9
Reception: Wednesday, April 30, 5 – 8 pm

2014-03-13 15_59_56-What They Were

Thesis Show: Fine Arts IX - Temporary Ground
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Christine Lewis, Zoey Chapin, Morgan O’Donnell-Curry, Christiana Lauzon, Kaitlyn Gozy, Michael Parrillo & Dominique Butori
On View: Monday, May 5 – Friday, May 9, 2014
Reception: Wednesday, May 7, 5 – 8 pm

1175388_10203768874841572_2940372548960877486_n

 Previous Shows:

Thesis Show: Fine Arts VI - Memoraphilia
Porter Mill, 95 Rantoul Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring Emily Fung, Ania Gruca & Elizabeth Paddock
Wednesday, April 16 – Sunday, April 27
Reception: Thursday, April 17, 5 – 8 pm

1530351_10153917563540153_1946166142_n

Thesis Show: Fine Arts IV - Seeking Solidarity
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Angela Gravel, Chelsea Nee, Kaitlyn Lampe, Chelsea Stewart, Claire Fenwick, Shoshana Browne-Gaiero & Jason Fandel
On View: April 14 – 18
Reception: Wednesday, April 16, 5 – 8 pm

1601231_10152261199863895_891301295_n

Thesis Show: Fine Arts V - AHA!
Mingo Gallery, 284 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Aubrey Gauthier, Haley Vessey & Amanda Hawkins
On View: Tuesday, April 15 – Friday April 25
Reception: Wednesday, April 16, 5 – 8 pm

2014-03-19 14_12_45-Mingo Gallery & Custom Framing

Thesis Show: Fine Arts III - Happy Birthday
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Daniela Thomas, Kerry McDermott, Greg Lines, Katy Rogers, Leon Vuong, Alex Gurney & Erin Patterson
On View: Monday, April 7 – Friday, April 11
Reception: Wednesday, April 9, 5 – 8 pm

10006097_10200808601096550_1812176698_o

Thesis Show: Fine Arts II - DÉRIVE
Porter Mill, 95 Rantoul Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Ariel Durkee, Alyssa Coffin, Corynn Larkin & Markie Remien
On View: Wednesday, April 2 – Sunday, April 13
Reception: Thursday, April 3, 5 – 8 pm

DÉRIVE- (n.) lit. “drift”; a spontaneous journey where the traveller leaves their life behind for a time to let the spirit of the landscape and architecture attract and move them.

Artists Statement: Our work touches upon the theme of personal narrative spaces. Some people find themselves lost in reality, while others become lost in their own mind; collectively, we hope to provide a place for viewers to think and reflect.

1238120_10152630695898906_579932452_n

Thesis Show: Illustration II - Chin Up
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Corey Cleary,  Gloria DiIanni, Jamie Marbury, Hannah Nicoll, Kristen O’Keefe & David Sam
On View: Monday, March 31 – Friday April 4
Reception: Wednesday, April 2, 5 – 8 pm

1004847_10153917465700080_1769204407_n

Thesis Show: Fine Arts I - Someone, Somewhere
Mingo Gallery, 284 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Candace Bonfiglio, Carly Brasier & Jill Hedrick
On View: Tuesday, April 1 – Friday, April 11
Reception: Wednesday, April 2, 5 – 8 pm

1618396_679391902104464_340712179_n

Thesis Show: Illustration I  - 7 x 14
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Alyssa Coffin, Erik Hechavarria, Grace Kettenbrink, Taylor Popek, Will Pottorff, Heather Scoggins, Michelle Tuttle & Thomas Wakely
On View: Monday, March 24 – Friday March 28
Reception: Wednesday, March 26, 5 – 8 pm

1960867_10152276135755803_1608100785_o

Thesis Show: Graphic Design - Going for Broke
301 Gallery, 301 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA
Featuring: Whitney Chin, Cait Hatfield, Caroline Lares, Amanda Foley, Nicole Reilly, Tiffany Valcourt & Liv Varney
On View: Monday, March 17 – Friday March 21
Reception: Wednesday, March 19, 5 – 8 pm

2014-03-12 16_54_30-Going for Broke - Design Process Show

301 Gallery Hours of Operation:
Mon. – Fri. 11:30 am – 2:30 pm, Sat. 12 – 5 pm & by appointment.

Montserrat’s public programs are free of charge and open to the public. For additional information please contact Montserrat Galleries’ Asst. Curator of Exhibition, Pamela Campanaro at 978.967.9604 or pamela.campanaro@montserrat.edu.


www.montserrat.edu

Accepted Students Day and Open House 2014

Saturday, April 12, 2014
On view through April 23

Montserrat College of Art’s Annual Accepted Students Day and Open House took place Saturday, April 12. It is the college’s annual spring event which celebrates the work of our community. Accepted students and their families spent the morning of Saturday, April 12th getting to know Montserrat a little bit more. They explored the campus, met our faculty and their potential new classmates!

Each year, the college’s buildings at 23 Essex Street and 301 Cabot Street become galleries and works of all students, including those in our Continuing Education program, are displayed in galleries, classrooms and hallways.

Open House is open to the public, 3- 6 pm that evening, and are encouraged to come and tour our facilities and see the latest work of our freshmen through seniors. On view were painting, drawing, prints, graphic design, sculpture, video, photography, animations, illustrations, book arts and creative writings.

An awards ceremony to present scholarships was held at 4 pm in the second floor hallway of the Hardie building, 23 Essex Street, Beverly.

The Award Recipients are as follows:

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Carol Schlosberg Scholarship – Kevin Lucey
Will and Elena Barnet Painting and Drawing Award – Amanda Hawkins 
Paul Scott Award – Zachary DeWitt 
Irene Michelini Scholarship – Deanna Jacome 
Will and Elena Barnet Art History Prize – Stephanie Visciglia
George Gabin Scholarship Fun – Sasha Pacek 
Jim Sawyer Scholarship – Bradford Lyon 
Bridget Endowed Fund – Paige Hall 
Gallery Della-Piana – Madelaine Dennis 
Ruth Mann Scholarship – Phoebe Warner 
Joan Jenner Scholarship – Katherine Roldan 
Fran F. Carreiro Scholarship – Michael LaChapelle (Loki) 
Lawrence M. and Frances Swan Smith Scholarship – Phoebe Warner 
Donna Maria Twarog Scholarship – Victoria Cossette 
Thomas Brassard Scholarship – Michelle Moore & Jack Truong 
The William and Ruth Fusco Scholarship in Fine Arts – Kayla Cochran 
Lisa Elwell Artist Encouragement Fund – Shannon Blencowe 
Beth Zion Scholarship Fund – Michael Outhuse 
Glovsky Award – Haley Vessey 
Hazen Family Fund Award – Kaitlyn Assmann 
Ollie Balf Scholarship Fund – Maria Echavez 
Bob Edwards Scholarship – Bronte Pirulli 
Elizabeth I Martin – Shae Vasile 

DEPARTMENTAL MERIT AWARDS
Printmaking – Robert Manson
Sculpture – Sarah Graziano 
Foundation – Hannah Keyes
Foundation – Sarah Downie 
Foundation – Michael Aghahow
Foundation – Giulia Davis
Foundation – Gina Semple 
Foundation – Aubrey Mueller 
Foundation – Katherine Rosengarten
Foundation – Kayla Dill 
Painting – Aubrey Gauthier 
Painting – Ian Cooper
Graphic Design – Samantha Perry 
Typography – Joanna Carey 
Photography – Adam Kooken 
Liberal Arts – Brenda Roswess 
Animation & Interactive Media – Bronte Pirulli 
Illustration – Hannah Connolly 
Art History – Kerry McDermott 
Creative Writing – Michael Parrillo 
Art Supplies Wholesale – Deanna Jacome 
Open House Design Publication Award – Alexandra Rios 
Book Arts – Taylor Kurmis 
Art Education – Ashley Mendes 
Internship Award – David Sam 
Studio for Experiential Learning – Adam Kooken
Alumni Award – Dylan Griffith


www.montserrat.edu

Montserrat Galleries’ Pamela Campanaro Published an Essay on Big, Red and Shiny

pam02 2

Photo by L. Barry Hetherington

Through Abstraction We Shape the World
By Pam Campanaro
April 09, 2014

Through abstraction, we shape the world. Through art, we translate thoughts, intuitions, feelings, and intentions into actions that transform reality.
- Olafur Eliasson

The first time I attended an Olafur Eliasson speaking engagement was at the Education + Activism Salon at Miami Basel in December of 2013. Eliasson was joined by Klaus Blesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1 to discuss the social business and emerging global project, Little Sun—a functional, high-quality solar-powered LED lamp developed in collaboration between Eliasson and engineer, Frederik Ottesen. Little Sun is a self-proclaimed “social business” with the aim to sustain a global wave of connecting the world by sharing, delivering, and sustaining an affordable, reliable light source for off-grid communities.

Photo by L. Barry Hetherington

The conversation between Eliasson and Blesenbach organically shifted to art’s ability to act as a catalyst for social justice. At a more fundamental level, the abstract ideas and critical dialogue that provoke exploration is a source of confidence and freedom for young artists that is hard to teach. It is learned naturally, through persistence and pursuit of one’s practice. I was struck over the head (hard) with a blunt statement made by Eliasson, “Young artists are so talented, but in a way, they are also traumatized.” He went on to elaborate, citing that the decision to pursue the arts as a language for engagement, in or out of art school, is a huge risk. It is unrelenting to invest in a passion as abstract and contested as art. Be it painting or curating or whatever discipline, the course is never defined. It is unclear and less concrete to commit to a practice that is continuously evolving, adjusting, and influencing a global perspective. And yes, while it is true other fields such as medicine evolve with new discovery, the absolute fact does not exist in art. To grow with a field that is still defining its own language and objectives is hard—and it demands confidence in order to persevere. As a result of Eliasson’s phrase, I became acutely aware of how much of his practice is a platform for education and empowering diversified youth to explore abstract thinking.

Olafur Eliasson and I crossed paths again, this time at the MIT public lecture “Holding Hands With the Sun” in honor of his recent Eugene McDermott Award in the Arts. On the surface, Eliasson’s lecture re-introduced the audience to Little Sun and reviewed a retrospective of his work. The audience was an assemblage of Boston-area artists, curators, scholars, students, engineers, philanthropists, etc. gathered from diversified fields. Together, a cultural geography of what collaboration looks like was formed that evening. Looking back, the crowd was a reflection of Eliasson’s think-tank studio model. Eliasson works with a cohort of interdisciplinary collaborators such as “slow walkers”, art historians, engineers, designers, food researchers, architects, and color experts to name a few. Although each background is different, the participants who impose their disciplines onto each project are quite interdependent. There is an inherent understanding that thinking abstractly is valued and, dare it be said, encouraged.

As a fairly recent Boston-area transplant working at an arts institution, I am continually reminded of the “risks” taken by the students I encounter daily and the “trauma” they face as budding artists. Eliasson’s studio practice has informed my social responsibility as a curator to the community of young artists with whom I engage. Artists and the projects they cultivate, like Eliasson and Little Sun, are macro reminders to the seemingly microcosm of students whose minds think abstractly. And while it is hard to drown out the noise of financial debt and questions like, “How will you make a living with an degree in Art?” a louder question resonates from the cultural shift spurred by Eliasson. He said it best during his MIT lecture: Rather than asking how? Ask why?

Photo by L. Barry Hetherington

Photo by L. Barry Hetherington

It is essential, in every stage of artistic growth and/or practice, to have the confidence to ask why. Why communicate through the language of medium? Why is conceptual thinking critical? Why is my stake in creative expression a valued pursuit? All of these questions relate to the ability to think abstractly and embracing the necessity to do so with confidence. Contrary to what a general public might think, it is a necessity. Abstract thinking is a fortuitous, viable skill. The generalization is to think of art in less than concrete terms because as a language, its communication is multi-layered.

I used to think that my responsibility as a curator and educator in the arts was to pass along little nuggets of truth. However, “Holding Hands With The Sun” has redirected my understanding of freedom and responsibility. The language of a “me” perspective that asks what the singular “I” can exchange with “you”, assumes an exclusive, elitist engagement. Rather, as evidenced in the studio practice of Eliasson and in the mood of the room that evening at MIT, multiple voices contribute to a participatory productivity combining this idea of freedom and responsibility.

In the end, the aesthetic beauty and cultural richness that comes from such conceptual thinking is what bridges the gaps between individual and community. I am fortunate enough to work in a place that facilitates a space where the aim can be about the experience and my language as a curator of desire and creativity is encouraged. It remains, however, a collective responsibility, to encourage one another to be confident in our independent thinking and continue to ask why.

Pam Campanaro is the Assistant Curator of Exhibitions at Montserrat College of Art. She received her MA in Exhibition and Museum Studies from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2011 and a BA in Art History and Museum Studies from Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA in 2009.


www.montserrat.edu

Workshop on Creativity and Innovation for Business Professionals

IMG_0540

On Thursday, April 3, participants joined Montserrat College of Art and the Enterprise Center at Salem State University for a unique, half-day workshop Unlocking Creativity and Innovation for Business Professionals held at the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem, MA devoted to understanding creativity for business professionals. Participants heard from and worked with esteemed Montserrat faculty who understand innovation through the creative process.

IMG_0521

In the workshop, participants:
• discovered that creativity is not an inherent gift, but rather a teachable process anyone can learn
• demonstrated their own aptitude for learning this way of thinking through expert-led, small group workshops
• discussed how this solution-based method is being adapted and applied by business leaders today, and
• left with resources to apply these concepts to their business

Workshop Included:
• Break-out Workshop Sessions: Culture of Critique facilitated by Fred Lynch, Mark Hoffman & Shanth Enjeti
• Feedback from breakout groups

See more photos here!

IMG_0512Fred Lynch is an illustrator, artist, and educator who lives outside of Boston, Massachusetts. He’s a professor of Illustration at Montserrat College of Art and teaches too at Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, (his alma mater). He’s been the recipient of Excellence in Teaching Awards at both institutions. An award winning illustrator, Fred’s works have been seen nationally and internationally for major corporations, magazines, publishers and newspapers. His artwork has been included in many national juried shows and regional exhibits. He has spoken recently on the topic of creativity at a number of venues including the Crossroads Convention of Educators and the Urban Sketchers Symposium in Barcelona. This summer, he’ll conduct a workshop in Paraty, Brazil.

IMG_0519Shanth Suresh Enjeti is an Assistant Professor at Montserrat College of Art in both the Illustration and Foundation departments, and is also a Senior Critic at Rhode Island School of Design where he received his BFA and has taught for more than a decade. Shanth balances his academic life with his career as an illustrator, designer, lecturer, and consultant for a variety of clients. His work has also been featured in several books on the field of art and design, and has presented at MIT, Wellesley College, Microsoft Games, Turbine Inc., and Hasbro.

IMG_0557Mark Hoffmann is an award winning illustrator, painter and animator. Mark earned a BFA in illustration from Rhode Island School of Design and MFA in visual design from University of Massachusetts- Dartmouth. His work can be seen internationally in a variety of print mediums and surface design. With a focus on low brow illustrations, Mark implies a whimsical visual dialogue with his audience. In his teaching, Mark relies heavily on constructive critiques and innovative approaches to idea building.


www.montserrat.edu

Alumni News: Chris Pianka Working for Nickelodeon

Animator Chris Pianka Holds On To His Roots
while Hanging with Hollywood Stars
by Kristin D’Agostino

Working at Nickelodian Studios, Chris Pianka gets to work with artwork from the Nineties.

Working at Nickelodeon Studios, Chris Pianka gets to work with iconic artwork from the Nineties.

Being a Massachusetts kid in Hollywood has its perks: Sharing a table with Leonardo DiCaprio at an Oscars party, hobnobbing with fellow cartoonists at the local comic book shop, and taking part in the local zine scene. But, best of all, says Montserrat grad Chris Pianka, is hanging out with Ren and Stimpy, something he does everyday as a library specialist at Nickelodeon Animation Studio’s artist resource library.

Pianka, who graduated in 2011 with an animation and interactive media degree, says his transition from New England to Hollywood has been “surreal” to say the least, but he’s enjoying every minute of it. The twenty-something animator accepted the job at Nickelodeon in February. He catalogues artwork; makes sure pieces are backed up in the digital archive; and shows past work to artists who come in seeking inspiration.

“My favorite part of the job is being able to pull out Sponge Bob or Ren and Stimpy,” he says, adding, “It’s really cool to go through this stuff.”

Nickelodeon, Pianka says, is currently in the process of reinventing itself, and is looking back to the Nineties for inspiration. “It’s about remembering that vibe and the roots of the art,” he says. “It’s a great time to be here.”

Chris Pianka is inspired by animators Hayao Miyazaki and Jean Giraud.

Chris Pianka’s work is inspired by Japanese and French animation.

Landing a job at a Hollywood studio did not come easily to Pianka. He attributes much of his success to a junior year internship he had with filmmaker Daniel Sousa where he worked on the animated film “Feral”. During this time, Pianka contributed some of his own drawings to the film, which went on to receive an Oscar nomination. The internship helped to land him another one at Nickelodeon the following summer. And, when Sousa came out to California to attend the Oscars for his film nomination, he invited Pianka to come with him to a week’s worth of events where Pianka made valuable industry contacts.

After the summer internship ended, Pianka returned home to the North Shore and life got decidedly less exciting. He moved in with his parents, got a coffee shop job, and began a third internship in Boston. But, the whole time he was in New England, Pianka worked hard at maintaining his connection to Hollywood life by reading animation blogs, and keeping in touch with people he’d met there. And, when a position opened up at Nickelodeon in February, Pianka was called in for an interview. The rest, as they say, is history.

In Hollywood Pianka hopes to develop his style so he can one day work on a show of his own.

In Hollywood Pianka hopes to develop his style so he can one day work on a show of his own.

In the future, Pianka would like to work as a storyboard artist and character designer on a cartoon show or to direct and produce his own show. But, for now, the young animator is content to act as a link between the artists of today and the artwork of the past. “I’m going to hold off pitching a show until I have a strong voice,” he says. “I want to develop a sense of who I am as an animation director. I want to have an idea to pitch that they won’t be able to resist.”

To other students who might want to follow in his footsteps Pianka has this advice: “If you’re going to make something your life’s work, you have to make it your life’s work. Put your work out there; meet people. Know your industry inside and out. It may take years to get there, but you can’t give up.”

- Kristin D’Agostino


www.montserrat.edu

Alumni News: Jim Campbell

Jim Campbell, an artist based in Indiana, attended Montserrat in the 1970s.

Jim Campbell, an artist based in Indiana, attended Montserrat in the 1970s.

Carved from a Stack of Books,
J
im Campbell’s Artwork is Bound to Inspire
by Kristin D’Agostino

In looking at Jim Campbell’s work, it’s easy to see the Indiana-based artist has a good sense of humor. A cookie, baked to a golden crisp, is displayed in a lower corner of his website. But, viewers beware- this is not your grandma’s chocolate chip cookie. Baked from a mold the artist carved himself, this tasty treat resembles an ancient relic found in a museum, complete with scene straight off a Japanese vase- a woman standing in front of a temple, gazing into the distance. This cookie is one example of how Campbell, a freelance designer and painter, likes to amuse himself and stay creatively challenged.

Jim Campbell attended Montserrat in the early 1970’s. After decades working in the printing industry as a designer, in the 1990’s with the advent of digital, Campbell was forced to reinvent himself. He studied Adobe InDesign and CAD technical drawing software, and spent the next years carving out a new career for himself as a freelance designer. These days he designs traveling exhibits for commercial clients.

Campbell does his part to keep print alive by carving sculptures out of old books.

Campbell does his part to keep print alive by carving sculptures out of old books.

When he’s not working, Campbell enjoys creating multi-media paintings and sculptures from materials such as foam, PVC and lightweight concrete. His brightly colored wall sculptures are geometric in their design, like Van Gogh in 3 D.

Recently Campbell has found a way to reconnect with the printing world: He’s been carving sculptures out of stacks of old books and magazines. “It’s a type of low relief carving into the edge of the publications,” the artist explains. “It keeps the spines intact and the surface of the pages acts like a relief surface.”

In one piece entitled The Tenth Muse, a voluptuous woman looks as though she’s about to step out of a stack of magazines. This sculpture, Campbell says, took about three weeks to create through a combination of rough carving and work with a band saw. The print sculptures, the artist says, are just another way stay challenged.

This cookie, titled Whispering Mountain, was inspired by Asian artwork.

This cookie, titled Whispering Mountain, was inspired by Asian artwork.

As for the cookie, this blogger wants to know, are there more, and will he share?

Unfortunately, no, says Campbell; the cookies were a passing phase. The curious must satisfy their hunger by feasting their eyes on the digital version on the artist’s website. Every last special cookie edition was eaten by friends and family.

Still painting and exhibiting his work locally, Campbell says he remembers his time at Montserrat fondly. “The teachers do a lot for helping you find yourself. The requirements of the classroom, the pressure to keep working and producing is important to being an artist.”

- Kristin D’Agostino


www.montserrat.edu

Montserrat’s Annual Open House April 12

ASD Open House Card

Saturday, April 12, 2014 | 3 – 6 pm
Awards Ceremony 4 pm

Open House will be Saturday, April 12 from 3-6 pm. It is the college’s annual spring event which celebrates the work of our community.

Each year, the college’s buildings at 23 Essex St. and 301 Cabot St. become galleries and works of all students, including those in our Continuing Education program, are displayed in galleries, classrooms and hallways.

Open House is open to the public and we encourage you to come and tour our facilities and see the latest work of our freshmen through seniors. On view will be painting, drawing, prints, graphic design, sculpture, video, photography, animations, illustrations, book arts and creative writings.

An awards ceremony to present scholarships will be held at 4 pm in the second floor hallway of the Hardie building, 23 Essex St., Beverly.


www.montserrat.edu

Gallery Update: Last Visiting Artist Talks of the Spring Semester

unnamed-3

Thursday, April 10th, 11:30am
Artist Talk: Valeri Larko

Landscapes found on the outskirts of American cities are the settings Valeri Larko is most drawn to. Her paintings capture the urban fringe and uncover stories within the ruins of contemporary culture.

Artist Talk Location: 23 Essex Street, Room 201

Valeri Larko, Diptych Ferris Stahl-Meyer, 2012, oil on linen

Valeri Larko, Diptych Ferris Stahl-Meyer, 2012, oil on linen

Monday, April 14th, 11:30am
Artist Talk: Greg Cook

Greg Cook’s talk is entitled “Remaking Our Sad World: From Community Activism to World-Building” and will be in conjunction with his installation,
The Saddest Forest on Earth, which is on view at the Frame 301 Gallery through April 18th.

Artist Talk Location: 23 Essex Street, Room 201

 Greg Cook,The Saddest Forest On Earth, 2014

Greg Cook,The Saddest Forest On Earth, 2014

Montserrat College of Art Galleries |23 Essex St. | Beverly | MA

for a complete list of upcoming visiting artists visit:
http://www.montserrat.edu/galleries/public-programs/index.php

for more information on Montserrat Galleries Public Programs:
please contact Savery Kelley at savery.kelley@montserrat.edu


www.montserrat.edu

Record-breaking numbers for Montserrat’s Annual Artrageous!28 Auction for student scholarship

Photo Cred: Montserrat alumna Jenn Frankavitz '08

Photo Cred: Montserrat alumna Jenn Frankavitz ’08

Montserrat College of Art’s annual art auction party, Artrageous!28 broke records Saturday night, March 29, when more than 1,000 friends of the college came together to raise approximately $432,000 for student scholarship.

Artrageous!28 guest taking a look at the art during the silent auction. Photo Cred: Montserrat student Michelle Behre '14

Artrageous!28 guest taking a look at the art during the silent auction. Photo Cred: Montserrat student Michelle Behre ’14

More than 260 paintings, prints, photographs, illustrations, sculpture, jewelry, giftware and trips were donated by Montserrat students, alumni, faculty, staff, trustees and established and emerging artists from across the nation for the auction.

Artrageous! has become the signature spring event on the North Shore. It was held at Shetland Park in Salem, MA. The annual auction supports much-needed student scholarship.

Chair of Montserrat's Board of Trustees Lee Dellicker of Windover Construction, Liz Dellicker and Montserrat President Steve Immerman. Photo Cred: Montserrat alumna Jenn Frankavitz '08

Chair of Montserrat’s Board of Trustees Lee Dellicker of Windover Construction, Liz Dellicker and Montserrat President Steve Immerman. Photo Cred: Montserrat alumna Jenn Frankavitz ’08

Guests were given the opportunity to see students create on-site artwork at several Art-In-The-Moment stations, experience Where Creativity Works at Montserrat, enjoy music from Salem-based band The Dejas and taste the culinary art of Timothy S. Hopkins Catering.

The night’s Featured Artist was Steve Locke, Honorary Chair was Mary Puma, Chairman/CEO, Axcelis, Lead Sponsors were Windover Construction, Inc. and Brookwood Financial Partners, LLC, Hal and Jodi Hess, and Mary Puma and Eivind Lange along with an impressive list of other sponsors.

Montserrat students during the Art-in-the-Moment. Photo Cred: Montserrat alumna Jenn Frankavitz '08

Montserrat students during the Art-in-the-Moment. Photo Cred: Montserrat alumna Jenn Frankavitz ’08

“My husband, Eivind and I had a fantastic time at the Artrageous!28 auction party, Saturday night,” said Honorary Chair Mary Puma, Chairman/CEO, Axcelis. “This really is a signature spring event on the North Shore. We are so happy to help raise scholarship funds for these deserving students while attending such a creative and exciting event! We are looking forward to next year’s already.”

A highlight of the evening was a call for direct scholarship aid during the live auction which raised more than $65,000 in support. All support for the event increased this year, from sponsorships, to catalog advertising, to ticket sales to the amount of art donated to the college to raise money for support.

For further information about Artrageous!28, visit http://www.montserrat.edu/auction28/ or contact Erin Carter at erin.carter@montserrat.edu, 978-921-4242 x1114.

Montserrat students and alumni celebrate in excitement as senior Taylor Clough's '14 (middle/white dress) piece sold for $2,900 during the live portion of Artrageous!28. Photo Cred: Montserrat student Dino Rowan Traite '16

Montserrat students and alumni celebrate in excitement as senior Taylor Clough’s ’14 (middle/white dress) piece sold for $2,900 during the live portion of Artrageous!28. Photo Cred: Montserrat student Dino Rowan Traite ’16


www.montserrat.edu

Student News: Katy Rogers Featured in Everett Independent

She’s Got Real Talent: Montserrat’s Katy Rogers Prepares for Her First Art Gallery Exhibit
By Cary Shuman, April 2, 2014, Everett Independent

E11Katy Rogers has known she wanted to be an artist since her tenth grade year at Everett High School.

“I was always interested in art and I liked to create things but I didn’t really take any formal art classes until my sophomore year in high school,” said Rogers.

Rogers, a 2010 Everett High graduate and a senior studying at Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, will participate in her first art gallery with other seniors on April 9 at 301 Cabot St. in Beverly. Rogers will graduate in May with a Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Art and a minor in Art History.

Rogers’s exhibition will feature six separate photo realistic, high-detail, black-and-white drawings of her Everett and Chelsea neighbors, whose ages range from 5 to 80. She has been working on the art project, which is part of her senior thesis, since October.

The 22-year-old’s superior artistic talent has already caught the eye of actor Bryan Cranston. Rogers personally presented a print to the Emmy Award-winning star of “Breaking Bad” after a perfomance in Boston last October.

“He told me he really liked my drawing of him,” Rogers recalled humbly of her conversation with Cranston.

Rogers has received a comprehensive education at the famed Beverly art school, taking six to eight art courses per year in addition to courses in the humanities, social sciences, and English.

“Attending Montserrat has been a great academic experience,” said Rogers. “I feel I’ve improved as an artist. They teach you more conceptually as opposed to the actual manufacturing of the art. What has been most helpful is they’re excellent at teaching you the whole process of being an artist in addition to creative skills.”

While Monteserrat has refined her artistic skills and prepared her to begin her career, Rogers credits the Everett school system for setting the foundation. There have been outstanding art teachers who inspired Rogers on each step of her journey.

“Shannon Kelleher Scire, Mrs. Scire as she was known to me, was my middle school art teacher for whom I did my first Harry Potter portrait, using a grid which inspired me to continue portraiture later on,” said Rogers. “It was selected to hang in the main hallway entering the Keverian School.”

That early Harry Potter artistic influence would come full circle when Rogers recently drew an image of Harry Potter star Tom Felton (who plays Draco Malfoy) and she was able to present him the drawing.

An honor roll student at Everett High, Rogers studied under the tutelage of art teachers Ms. Annette LeRay and Mrs. Katherine Rinaldi. “I took a variety of art classes and experienced a range of creative mediums – drawing, painting, collage, assemblage, etc. I did portraiture, I saw my potential and I wanted to keep improving. These dedicated teachers encouraged me and helped me prepare my college portfolio. Everett High had a fine arts academy as part of its curriculum so all my academic classes were art-oriented.”

Rogers received acceptances to five art schools and eventually decided on Montserrat.

The most influential teachers during her college career have been Sarah Smith, with whom she had several classes, and Mark Hoffmann, her advisor who is currently helping her with the progress of her upcoming show.

Rogers also enhanced her skills during an internship at the New England Aquarium in Boston. She spent 120 hours volunteering to render the realistic artificial coral that is in the Aquarium’s Giant Ocean Tank.

As always, Rogers’s family will be present for an important milestone. Her parents, Thomas and Patricia Rogers, grandmother, Ruth Lang, aunt Barbara Carlin, several cousins and friends will be attending her first public art exhibition in Beverly.

“I’m really excited about the show,” said Rogers. “I think people will enjoy the attention to detail in my portraits, my capturing of people in an intimate sort of environment. I’m showing a relationship. I really wanted to expose the people that I grew up around in a positive light. They’re very important to me and as an only child I was very aware of my neighborhood. There was a close-knit community on my street, one that wasn’t as common on other streets.”

Looking beyond her graduation from Montserrat, Rogers said she would like to be recognized for her artwork, continue to network, “and to keep improving as an artist.”


www.montserrat.edu

Montserrat Community Involved in Sea Change Production

unnamed

Montserrat College of Arts students have been collaborating with Sea Change Theatre Company for the following productions:

ThreeGiftsProduction-59

Three Christmas Gifts

Paige Hall: painter, scenic charge, and props assistant
Hannah Keyes: Head Painter
Bronte Pirulli: painter
LiAnn Natter: painter
Phil Hoa: props builder
Aubrey Mueller: props builder, fabric/costume assistant

sea_o (1)Antigone

Paige Hall: Intern/designer
Aubrey Mueller: tattoo shirt designer and painter
Ariel Lund: fabric manipulator
Hannah Keyes: fabric manipulator
For more ticket information, visit their Facebook page or contact info@seachangetheatre.com, call 978.500.3885


www.montserrat.edu

Caroline Bagenal Exhibits

Assoc. Prof. Caroline Bagenal has two sculptures in Visions/Visiones at the Museo del Convento de Santo Domingo Qorikancha, Cusco, Peru.

mayshowGREY

She also has two collages in the exhibition Transcripts/Transcrpciones at the ICPNAC

(Instituto Cultural Peruano Notramericano del Cusco) and two sculptures in Visions / Visiones at the Museo del Convento de Santo Domingo Qorikancha, Cusco, Peru. At the end of both exhibits these works will form part of the permanent collection of the Museo y Centro Cultural RIAZ, Cusco, ( ROOT Museum and Cultural Center).

In addition she will be showing sculpture at a two person exhibition in Pittsburgh.

Congratulations, Caroline!

 

 


www.montserrat.edu

 

Career Services Update: Summer Opportunities

Full-time
Visual Designer, IBM  Bay Area, CA
Buyer, Fab New York, NY
K-12 Art Teacher, Carney Sandoe & Associates
2-D Artist/Illustrator, Multimedia Games Austin, TX
Associate Graphic Designer, Reebok Canton, MA

PT / Temp/ Summer
Visitor Assitant, Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, MA
Guide, Otis House Museum Cambridge, MA
Visitor Services, MIT Museum Cambridge, MA
Temporary Gallery Staff, MIT Museum Cambridg, MA

Internships
Design Intern, Ideo San Fancisco, CA
Graphic and Web Design Internship, UFORGE Jamiaca Plain, MA
Gallery Internship, Rockport Art Association Rockport, MA
Videography Intern, United Independent Movement Boston, MA

Calls For Work
Student International Film Festival, Rijeka
The Road Gallery, NYC

Fellowships
AmeriCorps Camperhill Program, Lukas Community Temple, NH
Maker Fellow
Montserrat Summer Immersives Alumni Fellowship
Walter Feldman Fellowship for Emerging Artists
For the latest updates on Jobs and Summer Opportunities follow Montserrat’s Career Services on Twitter!
Montserrat’s Office of Career Services provides students and alumni with practical information and advice for professional career development. Our staff of artists and career professionals combines for a total 20 years of experience helping individuals navigate through the working world. Through internships, workshops, and opportunities to interact with practicing artists and professionals working in the field, the Montserrat Community actively engages with the Arts and Creative Industries beyond its walls.

Kirk Snow
Director of Career Services
kirk.snow@montserrat.edu
978.921.4242 x 1611

Amy Ruiter
Assistant Director of Career Services
amy.ruiter@montserrat.edu
978.921.4242 x 1610


www.montserrat.edu

Unlocking Creativity and Innovation for Business Professionals Workshop

Unlocking Creativity and Innovation for Business Professionals

Thursday, April 3, 8 am – 12 pm

A Half-Day Workshop Held At Held at the Hawthorne Hotel, 18 Washington Sq. W., Salem, MA

unnamed-1

The Enterprise Center at Salem State University together with Montserrat College of Art are offering a unique, half-day workshop at The Enterprise Center devoted to understanding creativity for business professionals. Participants will hear from and work with esteemed Montserrat faculty who understand innovation through the creative process.

In this workshop, you will:

  • Discover that creativity is not an inherent gift, but rather a teachable process anyone can learn
  • Demonstrate your own aptitude for learning this way of thinking through expert-led, small group workshops
  • Discuss how this solution-based method is being adapted and applied by business leaders today, and leave with resources to apply these concepts to your business

Workshop Outline
8 – 8:30 am — Registration and networking
8:30 – 9 am — Keynote Address: Fred Lynch
9 – 10:30 am — Break-out Workshop Sessions: Culture of Critique facilitated by Fred Lynch, Mark Hoffman & Shanth Enjeti
10:30 – 10:45 am — Break
10:45 – 11:15 am — Feedback from breakout groups
11:15 – 11:30 am — Closing Address: Fred Lynch
11:30 am – 12 pm — Reception

Register Now!

unnamed-2Prof. Fred Lynch is an illustrator, artist, and educator who lives outside of Boston, Massachusetts. He’s a professor of Illustration at Montserrat College of Art and teaches too at Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, (his alma mater). He’s been the recipient of Excellence in Teaching Awards at both institutions. An award winning illustrator, Fred’s works have been seen nationally and internationally for major corporations, magazines, publishers and newspapers. His artwork has been included in many national juried shows and regional exhibits. He has spoken recently on the topic of creativity at a number of venues including the Crossroads Convention of Educators and the Urban Sketchers Symposium in Barcelona. This summer, he’ll conduct a workshop in Paraty, Brazil.

unnamed-4Shanth Suresh Enjeti is an Assistant Professor at Montserrat College of Art in both the Illustration and Foundation departments, and is also a Senior Critic at Rhode Island School of Design where he received his BFA and has taught for more than a decade. Shanth balances his academic life with his career as an illustrator, designer, lecturer, and consultant for a variety of clients. His work has also been featured in several books on the field of art and design, and has presented at MIT, Wellesley College, Microsoft Games, Turbine Inc., and Hasbro.

unnamed-5Mark Hoffmann is an award winning illustrator, painter and animator. Mark earned a BFA in illustration from Rhode Island School of Design and MFA in visual design from University of Massachusetts- Dartmouth. His work can be seen internationally in a variety of print mediums and surface design. With a focus on low brow illustrations, Mark implies a whimsical visual dialogue with his audience. In his teaching, Mark relies heavily on constructive critiques and innovative approaches to idea building.


www.montserrat.edu

Greg Cook’s Sad Parade and Installation in the Frame 301 Gallery

2014-03-26 12_18_33-MontserratCollegeArt (MontCollegeArt) on TwitterThe current work in Montserrat College of Art’s Frame 301 Gallery is by our very own faculty member Greg CookThe Saddest Forest on Earth, installed Tuesday March 25, will be on view through Friday, April 18.

Greg hosted a special parade event, The Saddest Parade on Earth, that marched along the sidewalks of Beverly’s Cabot Street beginning at 11 am this past “Sad-urday,” March 29. The parade featured sad banners and signs, as well as a sad accordionist.  The parade concluded at The Saddest Forest on Earth, at the Frame 301 Gallery. The exhibition is a large diorama of an enchanted forest of crying, cartoony trees.

picSaddestParade140329_0051w-1024x707

The sad truth: Artist confronts sorry state of affairs with exhibit, parade (excerpt)
By Will Broaddus, The Salem News, Staff writer

Sometimes we don’t know whether to laugh or cry.

Artist Greg Cook captures this mixture of emotions in “The Saddest Forest on Earth,” a unique grove of trees he created for Montserrat College of Art’s 301 Gallery on Cabot Street in Beverly.

“It’s sort of like a poor man’s, do-it-yourself, wacky Disneyland kind of thing — but more disconcerting,” said Cook.

Painted on cutout fabric and ranging from 6 to 8 feet tall, Cook’s trees wear sad faces, while a shower of tears falls through their branches. They occupy the gallery’s window and present their mournful expressions to the traffic and pedestrians on Cabot Street.

“The space is 3 feet deep; it’s like a shallow diorama,” Cook said. “Mostly, I do cartoony kind of work. I do some illustration, some gallery or fine art, and it all has a cartoony sensibility.”

But if his trees look like they belong in a comic strip, they are also sharing a serious emotion that Cook believes is common these days.

“It’s a mix of serious and playful things,” he said.

Cook will also be giving a talk about his work “Remaking Our Sad World: From Community Activism to World-Building” on Monday, April 14, at Montserrat’s Hardie Building.

“The talk is about the relationship between, on the one hand, actions in the real world, trying to make it more fulfilling,” he said. “Then also, with the trees, it’s about inventing fantasy worlds.”

In Cook’s mixture of art and activism, difficult problems are addressed, but with a comic touch that lightens their burden.

Read Cook’s full feature in The Salem News.

*If you would like to volunteer to walk in the parade, contact Greg Cook at Gcook30@hotmail.com. Participants are asked to wear dapper outfits and help carry a sad banner or sign. The artist says, sadness is a helpful qualification, but not required.

In addition to being a teacher at Montserrat, Greg Cook is an artist, journalist and writer based in Malden, Massachusetts. The Saddest Forest on Earth is an offshoot of his “Enchanted Forest” series, which imagines a place of magical trees and birds and witches and hungry wolves. It is inspired by the history of New England, as well as Disney films and McDonald’s restaurant playgrounds. Parts of the series have appeared at Aviary Gallery in Boston; 17 Cox in Beverly; Zeitgeist Gallery in Lowell; Window Arts Malden; the Malden Parade of Holiday Traditions, and the restrooms of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts.

For more information on Greg Cook, please visit:
http://gregcookland.com/

picSaddestParade140329_0073w-1024x711 picSaddestParade140329_0062w-1024x525 picSaddestParade140329_0087w-1024x696


www.montserrat.edu

Summer Immersive Art Workshop with Dean Nimmer

Passionate Visions: Inroads into Making Abstract Art
with Dean Nimmer
July 7 – 11 / M – F / 9am – 4pm

The goal of this course is to inspire artists to move beyond myths and stereotypes to find the myriad of accessible possibilities for creating original abstract artworks inspired by your imagination. Projects will explore interpreting observed subjects abstractly, using the basic elements of color, line, shape, texture and value as subjects, and finding inspiration in literature, poetry and the performing arts. We will use a variety of media including; drawing, painting, collage and monoprints to discover new possibilities for rich compositions that will re-energize your enthusiasm for making art. This course is open to all levels.
unnamed-6
About Dean: Dean Nimmer has exhibited work across the US, Europe, China, Japan and Australia. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Smith Art Museum, Harvard University, Museum Haus Katsuya, Japan and the New York Public Library. Dean has received numerous grants including from the National Endowment for the Arts, Massachusetts Artists Foundation, Mass Cultural Council, and Jasper Whiting Foundation. He is the 2010 winner of the Distinguished Teaching of Art Award given by the College Art Association. He is also the author of the successful Random House book, Art from Intuition, now in it’s 5th printing, and he is writing a new book called Passionate Visions, slated for fall 2014.

Register before April 10 and save!

Summer Exhibition Opportunities

301 Gallery: Summer Immersive students past and present have the opportunity to submit work for a juried exhibition at Montserrat College of Art this summer.

Marblehead Art Association: Students who enroll in courses led by Tim HawkesworthBarbara Moody, or Maria Malatesta will have the opportunity to exhibit their work at the Marblehead Art Association, alongside the work of their instructors.

CALL FOR APPLICANTS

This year we are delighted to offer two fellowship awards, one for High School Educators, and one for Montserrat Alumni. Awards offer full tuition, housing and the opportunity to give an artist’s talk. For more information, and to apply, visit our website.

Affordable Housing by the Beach!

unnamed-5Stay on campus in our apartment style, air conditioned accommodations, just steps from class and five minutes to the beautiful beaches of Beverly!

Additional Art Workshops

June 9-July 11: Explore all our offerings from painting and fiber arts to comics and digital photography.

Apply Now!
Visit our website or contact us at ce@montserrat.edu or 978 921 4242 x 1202 to learn more.


www.montserrat.edu

Career Services Update: More Summer Opportunities

1395960_571098389611273_955090509_n

Full Time
Research Associate, Gate 3 Design Beverly, MA
Graphic Design Associate, French Cultural Center – Boston
Interactive Designer, Code and Theory New York, NY
Membership Assistant, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Boston, MA

PT / Temp/ Summer
Box Office, Regent Theater Arlington, MA
Visitor Services Assistant, Museum of the Russian Icon Clinton, MA
Textile Art Specialist, Beaver Summer Programs Chestnut Hill, MA
Ceramics Specialist, Beaver Summer Programs Chestnut Hill, MA

Internships
Zeitgeist Gallery Beverly, MA
Collections Intern, The Bostonian Society Boston, MA
Summer Program Intern, JP Kids Arts Boston, MA
Museum School Internship, Provincetown Art Association and Museum Provincetown, MA
Publication Intern, Big Cult Brooklyn, NY
The Sculpture Center Long Island City, NY
Arts Administration Internship, Arlington Committee on Tourism Arlinton, MA

Fellowships
Maker Fellow
Montserrat Summer Immersives Alumni Fellowship
Walter Feldman Fellowship for Emerging Artists

For the latest updates on Jobs and Summer Opportunities follow Montserrat’s Career Services on Twitter!

Montserrat’s Office of Career Services provides students and alumni with practical information and advice for professional career development. Our staff of artists and career professionals combines for a total 20 years of experience helping individuals navigate through the working world. Through internships, workshops, and opportunities to interact with practicing artists and professionals working in the field, the Montserrat Community actively engages with the Arts and Creative Industries beyond its walls.

Kirk Snow
Director of Career Services
kirk.snow@montserrat.edu
978.921.4242 x 1611

Amy Ruiter
Assistant Director of Career Services
amy.ruiter@montserrat.edu
978.921.4242 x 1610


www.montserrat.edu

Alumni Update: Margaurita Spear’s Art Workshops

Alumna Margaurita Spear ’09 has a couple April fundraiser she is involved in.

The first is a workshop in April at the Wenham Museum.
Wool Felting Fun
Friday, April 18; 1 – 3:30 pm
Members: $20, Non – Members: $25
Register by: Sunday, April 6

Learn to craft a palm–sized felted animal to take home, along with some tools and instructions so you can continue to craft with confidence. Art instructor Margaurita Spear will teach you how to work with unspun wool roving and a few other easy to find materials. Ages 8+

Register at: 978-468-2377 info@wenhammuseum.org

P3196570

Also, the Marblehead-Salem School of Music is donating their spacious Salem location and Spear is donating her time as an instructor to offer two classes during April Vacation Week. All proceeds will help fund the Danvers Dog Park.

DogPark

See more of Spear’s work here: www.margauritaspear.blogspot.com


www.montserrat.edu

Faculty News: Julia Shepley Exhibits in Berlin

20140209112134-OvidsGirls

Montserrat Faculty Member Julia Shepley has an upcoming show in Berlin for US and German Sculptors entitled Ovid’s Girls.

Ovid’s Girls will be an exhibition at the Boston Sculptors Gallery featuring artworks by twelve female sculptors, six from the USA and six from Germany, all sharing an aesthetic of the evocative and enigmatic. The exhibition will highlight parallels and relationships in the artwork, in a cross-continent dialogue of ideas, materials, and conceptual approaches.

Two companion exhibitions of Ovid’s Girls, featuring the same artists, will be hosted at the Kunstverein Tiergarten in Berlin, Germany and at the MEWO Kunsthalle in Memmingen, Germany.

The exhibition will be hosted by three different venues in 2014. The first will be at the Kunstverein Tiergarten in Berlin, Germany (April 4 to May 3, 2014), followed by the Boston Sculptors Gallery in Boston, USA (June 25 to August 3, 2014), and then at the MEWO Kunsthalle in Memmingen, Germany (September 19 to November 8).

For more information, please see the show’s website: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/ovid-s-girls.

Congratulations, Julia!


www.montserrat.edu

Montserrat’s Project with Footprint Power Featured in Boston Globe

The art and heart of Salem Harbor Power Station
By Kathy McCabe | THE BOSTON GLOBE STAFF MARCH 27, 2014 

PHOTOS BY JOANNE RATHE/GLOBE STAFF

The blinking red lights on its soaring emission stacks, an icon for mariners and airplane pilots on the North Shore, will go dark after the 63-year-old coal-and-oil fired power plant closes on May 31.

Its big, noisy machines, such as the original General Electric turbine, will fall silent after the plant is torn down and replaced by a new $1 billion gas-fired plant.

For workers with decades on the job, life without the old coal plant seems hard to imagine.

“We’ve all walked through that gate for years and years,” said stockroom manager Beth Tobin, 52, who has worked at the plant for 28 years. “It’s kind of weird to think that you’re not going to be doing that anymore.”

PHOTOS BY JOANNE RATHE/GLOBE STAFF

PHOTOS BY JOANNE RATHE/GLOBE STAFF

But through the eyes of students at Montserrat College of Art, Salem Harbor station and its 105 workers will not fade quietly into the landscape.

The Beverly college and Footprint Power, the plant’s New Jersey-based owner, have teamed up to create “Across The Bridge,” an art course and exhibition that will celebrate the power plant workers.

Armed with video cameras and sketch pads, and outfitted in hard hats and yellow safety vests printed with “artist” on the back, Montserrat students are getting a rare look inside a 1950s-era industrial facility.

“I love the lights,” Chelsea Stewart, 22, a senior painting major from a small village near Albany, N.Y., said over the roar of the pulverizer. “It’s so dark, but there’s this glow. It can look orange, yellow, or blue. I like colors.”

“I had no idea about a power plant or what it did,” said Kerry McDermott, 22, of Burlington, a photography and art education major. “It’s opened my eyes about all these people who have worked here for so long, and now they have to start new lives, which is obviously so painful.”

Since January, about 30 students have visited the plant once a week to interview workers for a video archive. The workers’ stories will then be turned into painting, sculpture, and other art forms that will be displayed at the plant in July.

“There is a lot of history in this plant,” said Peter Furniss, chief executive of Footprint, seated in an office overlooking the scenic Salem harbor. “We have about 105 people working here, who have a combined tenure at the facility that is probably 500 years. They have a wealth of stories. I wanted to find a way to preserve those stories and honor their service.”

Furniss proposed the idea of the art project to Montserrat president Stephen Immerman, with whom he serves on the board of the North Shore Chamber of Commerce.

“I saw it as a real opportunity to enhance the quality of our students’ experience in a real-world setting,” Immerman said.

“Across the Bridge,” a name that reflects the only way to travel from Beverly to Salem by land, aims to inspire students through the lives and jobs of the power plant workers.

“Their practice is different than usual,” said Rebecca Bourgault, an assistant professor and chairwoman of the art education program at Montserrat. “They are working with a very specific subject matter that is very new to them. It requires new approaches and a lot of discipline.”

At first, plant workers were skeptical. Most have spent their entire working lives dressed in soiled workboots and hard hats. They’ve bulldozed raw coal, crawled through narrow spaces to fix machines, dragged hoses, and climbed to the top of its nearly 600-foot emission stacks.

Most of the workers will be laid off in June. Footprint will keep a handful to wind down operations this summer, Furniss said. Workers will be paid severance packages and have been offered help with retraining for new jobs, he added. The new plant is scheduled to open in 2016.

“We did heavy, hard work here,” said Priscilla Canney, 62, a stockroom clerk who spent most of her 28 years at the plant in mechanical maintenance. “Some of the tools we had to work with were just huge.”

They never imagined their working lives would inspire art.

“We’re power plant workers, not art students,” said Tobin, the plant’s coordinator for the project. “I’m not sure people, at first, really knew what to expect. What kind of art would they make here?”

The relationship evolved slowly. Students made videos to introduce themselves to workers. They visited the plant with three professors. Workers gradually warmed to the idea of sharing their stories of work and friendship.

The coal pile at Salem Harbor station is shrinking as the plant’s closing nears.

JOANNE RATHE/GLOBE STAFF
The coal pile at Salem Harbor station is shrinking as the plant’s closing nears.

“We’re a close group here, and we know better than others what it’s been like to work here,” said Ed Dattoli, a mechanical maintenance supervisor who has also worked 28 years at the plant.

“The whole place as we know it is going to be gone,” said Dattoli, driving in a truck near a coal pile. “At least we’ll have this [artwork] to remember it.”

Miledy Santana, a chemist at the plant, said working with aspiring artists has helped ease the pain of the plant’s looming demise.

“The students I’ve worked with are very, very friendly,” said Santana, who lives in Methuen. “They’re fascinated with what we do here. Now they know my story.”

Santana will be featured in a video documentary about women workers that McDermott plans to create.

“I’ve always been really interested in documentaries and this is a good chance to make one,” McDermott said. “The women here are such a minority. I’ve gotten some really interesting stories about how they’ve dealt with working in such a masculine environment.”

Stewart plans to create a large, abstract portrait, drawn in charcoal and pastel colors.

“I’m thinking of mixing everything that I see,” she said. “The walls, the floors, the lights. I’d like it to be half about the building, half about the people.”

Kathy McCabe can be reached at katherine.mccabe@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @GlobeKMcCabe.


www.montserrat.edu

Anna Schuleit Haber Featured in The Boston Globe for Beverly Oracle

Beverly may answer life’s mysteries through oracle project
By Kathy McCabe THE BOSTON GLOBE STAFF MARCH 27, 2014

JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF)/ (RIGHT)LEXIA ORTIZ-MELO

JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF)/ (RIGHT)LEXIA ORTIZ-MELO

In ancient Greece, pilgrims traveled from distant lands to seek the wise counsel of the Oracle at Delphi.

Artist Anna Schuleit Haber has imagined the oracle returning, but this time in digital form, speaking poetry on Beverly Common.

“I wanted to work in a way that would bring an aspect of mystery to Beverly, through a project that would invite people to come and sit down on the common, to have an experience of poetry in an unusual place,” Schuleit Haber, 39, said in the soft accent of her native Germany.

The Beverly Oracle was born.

Schuleit Haber designed the poetry-based project for the city, Montserrat College of Art, and Beverly Main Streets as part of a National Endowment for the Arts public art competition.

The oracle — which has not yet received city approvals to be built on the common — would run on wireless technologies.

A glass pavilion, capable of changing colors, would be built. Once inside, a visitor would sit in what Schuleit Haber describes as a “single, strange chair,” capable of reading body rhythms.

Like the ancient Greeks at Delphi, a visitor would ask a question. The answer would come from a digital library filled with the words of American poets and writers from across the country.

Adding to the mystery, the oracle’s answers — but not the questions — would be displayed on digital panels installed at four high-profile downtown locations: the train station off Rantoul Street, and corners of Cabot Street at Central, Dane, and Winter streets.

“The oracle will be filling the urban space with poetry and riddles,” Schuleit Haber said, reading from her project proposal.

Schuleit Haber, a visual artist based in Brooklyn, has a degree in painting from Rhode Island School of Design. She also earned a master’s degree in creative writing from Dartmouth College.

In 2006, she received a “genius” fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation. In Massachusetts, she is best known for creating art memorials at old mental health hospitals.

In 2001, Schuleit Haber staged a sound installation at Northampton State Hospital, piping Bach’s Magnificat through the abandoned building. Two years later, she filled Massachusetts Mental Health Center in Boston with 28,000 live plants and flowers as a tribute to former patients.

Since September, Schuleit Haber has been an artist in residence at Montserrat. She has appeared as a guest critic in classes, but spends much of her time in the printmaking studio, where she has worked on the oracle’s design with help from six Montserrat interns.

“It’s such an interesting project,” said Christiana Lauzon, 21, a senior painting major from Augusta, Maine, who has built 3-D models of the oracle’s chair. “It’s not like people will just be looking at a piece of art. They’re going to experience it.”

Some interns may join Schuleit Haber on a cross-country trip this summer to collect answers for the oracle. She plans to drive her butterscotch-colored 1973 Buick Centurion to visit with writers and poets. Her dog, Finnegan, also will be along for the ride.

“It’s a mysterious way of picking them,” Schuleit Haber said of the writers and poets on her list.

Jane Brox, a Dracut-born writer now living in Maine, contributed the oracle’s first answer. Schuilet Haber declined to reveal it.

Schuleit Haber has made presentations about the project to schools — including at a Beverly High assembly where 1,200 students were given the chance to submit questions to the oracle — business, and civic groups. At the end of each talk, she asked people to write down a question for the oracle.

“I ask them to really ask themselves what’s important to them,” she said.

Some have asked, “How do I face my fading beauty?” “Is anybody really meant to be alone?” “Will I get into Harvard?” “Are you absolutely sure?”

Schuleit Haber promises answers of poetic mystery.

“They will receive a fragment of poetry or a riddle,” she said. “The Delphi Oracle never gave a straight answer.”

Stephen Immerman, president of Montserrat, hopes The Beverly Oracle will become a signature piece of public art.

“We want something world-class,” Immerman said during an interview at the college’s printmaking studio. “We wanted a public art project that is interactive and permanent. We didn’t want it to be an event, which many public art projects are.”

Montserrat soon will start to raise $250,000 to pay for the final design and construction of the project. “We’ll be applying for grants and soliciting support from foundations that support public art,” Immerman said.

Mayor Michael Cahill predicted that the Beverly Oracle will boost the city’s arts scene.

“It holds the promise of helping to create a sense of place,” said Cahill, who took office in January. “It would be a draw that would bring people here, and brand us a destination for art and culture.”

Montserrat and the city now are trying to determine what local permits would be required for the oracle to be built on public property.

Cahill said he is not yet ready to support locating the oracle on the city’s grassy common, the heart of downtown.

“I can’t say yet if it would, or should, go there. We’re just now starting a conversation with Montserrat about the specifics of all of this,” Cahill said.

One alternative site could be Ellis Square, located just off Cabot Street, and not far from the common.

“That would put it very close to our restaurants and shops downtown,” Cahill said.

Gin Wallace, executive director of Beverly Main Streets, said the oracle could make Beverly a must-stop on the region’s tourist trail.

“This will help distinguish us from our neighbors,” Wallace said. “When people come to visit Gloucester in summer, or Salem in October, we want them to come to Beverly. We’re kind of banking on this putting us on the arts and tourism map.”

The oracle proposal comes as Beverly’s artistic star is rising. Montserrat was chosen last month by the state Department of Housing and Economic Development to lead the Creative Economy Network — a statewide effort to boost local art industries — on the North Shore.

Montserrat, the city, and Main Streets in 2012 received a $75,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to create a master plan for an arts and cultural district downtown. A portion of the grant also was used to sponsor a public art competition. Schuleit Haber’s proposal was chosen from a field of 75 submissions from across the country.

“We had proposals that were stunningly remarkable, visually and conceptually,” Immerman said. “But Anna’s proposal eclipsed all of them in terms of its intelligence, creativity, and its imagination.”

————————————
Some of the questions people in Beverly submitted to Anna Schuleit Haber to be considered for the Beverly Oracle Project:
■ How can I be relevant?
■ What can I do to make people happy?
■ How do I face my fading beauty?
■ How can I share my love with the world?
■ Should I retire or start a business?
■ Will I be a Dad?
■ Will I ever see peace in the world?
■ How long will I live?
■ I tried to find, and understand, but I still feel lost. How do I know when I’m not?
■ What’s good for my heart?
■ Is anybody really meant to be alone?
■ Will I ever marry again?
■ Will I get into Harvard?
■ Are you absolutely sure?

SOURCE: Anna Schuleit Haber

Kathy McCabe can be reached at katherine.mccabe@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @GlobeKMcCabe.


www.montserrat.edu

Faculty News: Dawn Paul’s Komodo Dragon Published

notsomewhereelse

Dawn Paul’s short story “Komodo Dragon” was recently published in a book titled Not Somewhere Else But Here: a Contemporary Anthology of Women and Place.

The books is on display in our Paul Scott Library.

To see more of her work visit: http://corvidwriters.org/dpaul/

Not Somewhere Else But Here: A Contemporary Anthology of Women & Place
Edited by Erin Elizabeth Smith, T.A. Noonan, Rhonda Lott and Beth Couture

In this 300+ page eclectic and engaging multi-genre anthology of contemporary women writers, you will find literature that transports readers across the entirety of the globe. Writers in Not Somewhere Else But Here: A Contemporary Anthology of Women & Place, include Marjoie Maddox, Wendy Call, Barbara Crocker, Marthe Reed, Karyna McGlynn, Rosebud Ben-Oni, Dianne Seuss, Sarah Sloat, and many, many more!

“Miniature celebrations of place, the writings in Not Somewhere Else But Here deftly maneuver through imagined spaces and bustling Manhattan streets, the impossible page and the architecture of Japanese homes. Here, place is questioned and subdued: it is the hot gloss of sun on concrete.”
-Lily Hoang, author of The Evolutionary Revolution and Changing

“The writing in Not Somewhere Else But Here is at turns haunting and infused with a deep magic. The work carries the reader from Beirut to Vermont, from Japan into dream worlds, bodies as maps. Landscapes are often treacherous, populated with ‘mouths of razor-wild men’, enchanted with ‘fists opened to explosions of diatomic stars,’ and each woman in this collection navigates those spaces with a deft grace. Step into the worlds they have summoned.”
-Margaret Bashaar, Editor of Hyacinth Girl Press


www.montserrat.edu

Summer Enamel Art Workshop at Montserrat

Copper Enameling: Exploring and Creating Light, Color and Depth with Glass Kiln Fused onto Copper
June 23 – 27 | M – F 9am – 4pm
led by Cynthia Miller

Montserrat invites you to join us for a week-long, immersive course in enamels open to all levels of experience. Create objects that capture and celebrate light, color and depth like no other medium. Learn to prepare, apply and successfully fire sparkling enamel objects: wall hangings, bowls and shapes that can be incorporated into jewelry.

Miller_Cynthia_bioAbout Cynthia: Cynthia Miller is a passionate artist and educator, holding a BFA from the University of Illinois, an MFA from Northwestern University, and completing intensive study of copper enameling with Richard Loving at the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the recipient of numerous awards for her enameling work, and has exhibited widely. In addition to her passion for copper enameling, Cynthia has also acted and directed professionally, taught art and humanities courses at Columbia College and the International Academy of Design. She currently lives in Tucson, Arizona.

Register before April 10 and save!
unnamed-3This course is made possible in part by receipt of a grant from The Enamelist Society to purchase a kiln.

Summer Exhibition Opportunities

301 Gallery: Summer Immersive students past and present have the opportunity to submit work for a juried exhibition at Montserrat College of Art this summer.

Marblehead Art Association: Students who enroll in courses led by Tim Hawkesworth, Barbara Moody, or Maria Malatesta will have the opportunity to exhibit their work at the Marblehead Art Association, alongside the work of their instructors.

CALL FOR APPLICANTS

This year we are delighted to offer two fellowship awards, one for High School Educators, and one for Montserrat Alumni. Awards offer full tuition, housing and the opportunity to give an artist’s talk. For more information, and to apply, visit our website.

Affordable Housing by the Beach!

unnamed-5Stay on campus in our apartment style, air conditioned accommodations, just steps from class and five minutes to the beautiful beaches of Beverly!

 

Additional Art Workshops

June 9-July 11: Explore all our offerings from painting and fiber arts to comics and digital photography.

Apply Now!
Visit our website or contact us at ce@montserrat.edu or 978 921 4242 x 1202 to learn more.


www.montserrat.edu

Health Center Update: Spring Salad Ideas

Arugula Salad with Beets and Goat Cheese

photo Arugula salad with beets, goat cheese, walnuts and a simple vinaigrette.

photo Arugula salad with beets, goat cheese, walnuts and a simple vinaigrette.

INGREDIENTS Salad Ingredients: • Beets – (boiled until a fork easily goes in it, about an hour), peeled, sliced into strips • Fresh arugula – rinsed, patted dry with a paper towel • Goat cheese – chevre • Walnuts – chopped Dressing ingredients: • Olive oil • Lemon • Dry powdered mustard • Sugar • Salt and pepper

METHOD The amount of ingredients depends on how many people you are serving and how much salad you intend to serve them. The important thing is that this is a good blend of flavors. I didn’t try tossing this salad; each plate was composed individually. The dressing for three individual salads was 1/4 cup of olive oil, 1/2 lemon, 1/4 teaspoon of powdered mustard, 3/4 teaspoon of sugar, salt and pepper to taste. Actually, it is all to taste. These are only approximate measurements. Assemble the salad according to how much you want. A handful of arugula leaves, a few beet juliennes, some crumbled goat cheese, garnish with chopped walnuts. Use a vinaigrette salad dressing or what I’ve described above.

Simply Recipes http://www.simplyrecipes.com


www.montserrat.edu

Upcoming Artist Talk: Jennifer Riley

Artist Talk: Jennifer Riley
Wed., April 2, 11:30 am
23 Essex Street, Beverly, Hardie Room 201

Recognizing the history of storytelling, myth, cultural lore and icons from differing centuries and cultures, Jennifer Riley works towards an understanding of how the past is comprehended and experienced in this moment.

Jennifer Riley, Wolfcreek Howl, 2013

Jennifer Riley, Wolfcreek Howl, 2013

Montserrat College of Art Galleries | 23 Essex St. | Beverly | MA

For a complete list of upcoming visiting artists visit:
montserrat.edu/galleries/public-programs

For more information on Montserrat Galleries Public Programs:
please contact Savery Kelley at savery.kelley@montserrat.edu


www.montserrat.edu

Call for Artists: 2014 Artists’ Row Program

artistrow1
Mayor Kimberley Driscoll is looking for artists and craftspeople to participate in Artists’ Row, a seasonal art space initiative from May 22 to November 2, 2014. Art space is provided rent-free, and in exchange, requires selected artists to provide free art workshops and/or performances for the community.

Applications and program guidelines are available from the Salem Department of Planning & Community Development, 120 Washington Street, or on the City’s Website at http://www.salem.com/pages/artistrow

Applications must be received by or before 12pm (noon), April 11, 2014. Up to three (3) Art Stalls will be awarded.

A site visit will be held on April 3, 2014 from 5:00pm – 5:30pm at Artists’ Row (24 New Derby Street) to view the available art stalls. For questions, contact Frank Taormina at (978) 619-5685.


www.montserrat.edu

Alumna Lindsey Parker’s UnchARTed project

20140324__TFront~p1UnchARTed gallery shaping up in Lowell as place for artists to show their creativity
By Samantha Allen, Lowell Sun

Montserrat College of Art alumna Lindsey Parker ’09 remembers when her concept of a group of local artists coming together and collaborating in Lowell was just an idea in a cramped space filled with trash.

Five years ago, she set out with some friends to open artist studios on Merrimack Street under the name UnchARTed. Originally, they rented a space for free at 126 Merrimack St., as the crew of artists banded together to clean out cluttered rooms and make space for themselves.

“It was literally just heaps of junk,” Parker recalled.

Today, the group is now at 66 Merrimack St., in a spiffy gallery space with hardwood floors and simple white walls they renovated and repaired themselves. Parker, a Chelmsford High School graduate, was joined by local artist and musician Michael Dailey Jr. in continuing to lead the group’s efforts.

“What you see here is really just friends and beer,” Dailey said, of the current space.

Parker, 26, and Dailey, 40, have about 20 artists in their guild, though they say they’re anything but pretentious when it comes to their group or their semiunderground “brand.” They market their gallery, and studio space for rent above, as a place where any artist, starting out or longstanding, can get a start in the art world.

“I look at us like we’re just a resource in the community, the creative community, and we’re just facilitating artists who are either very sure of themselves … or they’re not so sure of their creative abilities and they want to take a whack at it,” Parker said. “I feel like we’re providing a space that’s low maintenance, low stress. It’s an open forum for anyone to try their creative urges.”

The gallery is hosting, through Sunday, an exhibition by Rachel Napear called “Dedicated to the Proposition: The Civil War Recreated.” Napear, a photographer who traveled with Civil War re-enactors and took photos documenting their anachronistic creations, said UnchARTed gave her space to host her first show ever.

Occasionally, the gallery will host joint shows with the artists who spend their time upstairs, too. Local artists from across Greater Lowell spend their days working in the small rooms, which are available for rent at a rate of $155 to $205.

Corey Luebbers of Chelmsford is working on a mural that spans almost the entirety of one wall in his small studio with a window looking over downtown.

And Roy Hawes, a 2002 Lowell High School graduate, spends a majority of his time devoted to his paintings. As Hawes walked through his studio, which he said had just been rearranged, dozens of his works covered the walls and spots of paint covered his workspace.

“It just happened, really,” he said. “A person that I knew mentioned a couple of people were starting a studio and still looking for spots for people to take. So I jumped at it, because I didn’t have my own studio. It’s my first time having a room with a door on it.”

Giovanna Aviles, a Lowell photographer and artist, said UnchARTed gave her an opportunity to get back into the art scene after she gave birth to a daughter. She said the studio is a space where she can come and work and get inspired, and she’s also working to convert one of UnchARTed’s rooms into a community darkroom open to the public.

“The great thing about UnchARTed is, they give people an opportunity,” Aviles said. “They base it on potential.”

She said that after graduating from UMass Lowell, she missed the experience of receiving feedback and critiques from her peers. That’s why Parker, who graduated from Montserrat College of Art, hosts monthly meetings with the group for UnchARTed artists to inspire one another.

The UnchARTed project is Parker’s full-time passion away from her full-time day job as a screen printer. She and Dailey and the group pour themselves into helping fellow artists put on shows.

Parker said that though they’re not officially nonprofit, any money raised goes back into developing shows or offering space to renters.

When Parker gets a moment, she comes to her sun-drenched studio to work on her own pieces and to experiment with her large, antique printing press. She said she met Dailey at 119 Gallery, another Mill City artist venue on Chelmsford Street, to which she credits much of UnchARTed’s success.

“It organically formed into, now, this living organism,” she said. “This combination of weird people are making it happen and keeping it interesting. … I’m not sure what will happen in the future because I never even expected it to be this. I don’t even know where we could take it.”

UnchARTed Gallery is located at 66 Merrimack St. The closing reception for Rachel Napear’s Civil War-themed exhibition is scheduled for Sunday, starting at 7 p.m. On Saturday, May 31, the gallery will host the second annual Mill City Skillshare. For more details, click here!


www.montserrat.edu

Don’t miss the North Shore’s Artrageous! Auction Party: March 29

unnamed

Montserrat College of Art’s Annual Auction Party

live-celebration

Don’t miss THE North Shore’s signature Artrageous! spring event on Saturday, March 29 at Shetland Park, Salem, MA

unnamed-1

Artwork by Steve Locke, monument #1, 2013

Featured Artist
Steve Locke

Honorary Chair
Mary Puma
Chairman and CEO, Axcelis

Lead Sponsors
Windover Construction, Inc.
Brookwood Financial Partners

For more information + tickets visit
www.montserrat.edu/auction28

Tickets are available on-line until Wednesday, March 26 at 5 pm. Prices will increase by $15 at the door the night of the auction.

 

Public Previews: March 26, 27 & 28, 10 am – 3 pm or by appointment
Shetland Park, Building 4, Entrance V, 27 Congress Street, Salem, MA

View our Artrageous!28 promotional video here!

Contact: Erin Carter
978.921.4242 x 1114
erin.carter@montserrat.edu

Photo by Dino Traite ’16: Senior Morgan Dyer reacts with excitement as one of her paintings in the live auction becomes the object of an aggressive war between bidders. Her piece, valued at $1500, sold for $3500!


www.montserrat.edu

Bea Modisett: Field Work Reception

IMG_2212

Bea Modisett: “Field Work”
On View: March 19–April 6
Reception: Thu., March 20, 5-7pm
Carol Schlosberg Alumni Gallery
Artist Talk: Wed., March 26, 11:30am
montserrat.edu/galleries/schlosberg

Montserrat College of Art is proud to present, Field Work an exhibition featuring painter Bea Modisett ‘07. Field Work is rooted in the artist’s passion to explore landscape. Modisett is inspired by her experiences visiting unfamiliar places such as Bangkok, Cambodia and the Western US. The artist subjectively holds on to each encounter through her paintings. This exhibition explores how travel reconstructs and impacts the remembrance of place.

IMG_2220The title, Field Work references the travel and experience that ultimately serves as research for each of Modisett’s abstraction. Within the artist’s practice, painting and travel are dependent parts. “They both fulfill the desires to create and overcome problems, to learn, to put myself in uncomfortable situations, to experience the intense highs and lows… It challenges me in so many ways and excites parts of my brain that may normally lay dormant. When I return from any type of travel, I seek to recreate that stimulation and excitement in my paintings – this always leads to growth.”IMG_2219

To satisfy a more immediate result, Modisett is currently experimented with charcoal. “Settling In”, (2014) is an abstract, modular landscape constructed in charcoal. The piece embodies the core of Field Work- provoking investigation and study. The grayscale of charcoal necessitates the viewer to linger in order to observe the surface more carefully. Unlike her work in oil, which uses color to designate sky, rock and land, charcoal negates any of these visual clues that aide in the readership of the piece. Even the title, “Settling In” reinforces its anomonity. Without these more obvious “hints” to help the viewer to read the painting, the more important it becomes to that the viewer slow down and do some examining or “field work” of their own.

Photo Cred: Terry Slater


www.montserrat.edu

Alumni Update: Neil Wilkins Upcoming Exhibits

unnamedAlumnus Neil Wilkins ’97 is bringing a wide range of his work to Natick for a solo show in two locations! Confluence opens for the month of April in the Summer Street Gallery at The Center for Arts in Natick (TCAN) and continues at Renew Arts & Industry. Both venues are just steps away from each other in downtown Natick.

He’ll be hosting an opening on Saturday, April 19, 2 – 4 pm at TCAN followed by an artist talk at Renew at 4:30 pm.

See more of his work here: http://neilwilkins.com/


www.montserrat.edu

Alumnus Brett Mason Wins Beverly Main Streets Banner Contest

This year Beverly Main Streets received more than 25 entries as part of our “blank canvas” light pole banner design competition. They are pleased to announce local artist and Montserrat College of Art alumnus Brett Mason‘s unique watercolor design was chosen for the 2014 summer banner. Fifty banners will be installed by the City of Beverly on Cabot and Rantoul Streets, along with tags clearly displaying the name of the sponsor. The banners provide visual impact and highlight our local arts community.

unnamed

Brett grew up in Beverly and graduated from Montserrat College of Art. When asked about his design, Brett said, “The design is from an abstract watercolor on paper piece I did 3 years ago, which was right around the time when abstract expressionism became a growing interest for me as a painter…When brainstorming ideas I knew that painting would be perfect for the banner design. It is also interesting that the color scheme matches the logo for Beverly Main Streets.” You can see more of Brett’s work at www.brettmasonart.com.

When asked about downtown Beverly, Brett said, “There’s always something to do downtown whether it be checking out the galleries, grabbing a bite to eat or simply walking around. It’s also nice seeing the growing potential since I started college in 2008. It’s a great place to be!”

Beverly Main Streets would like to thank Brett and all of the talented artists who submitted their designs for the competition, the City of Beverly for installing the banners and the sponsoring businesses.

Learn more here: www.beverlymainstreets.org


www.montserrat.edu

Health Center Update: Insurance in College

1503900_716237208408629_901886185_n

It appears that some of you students are not aware of how to access your insurance.

Here are a few pointers:

• If you have the insurance offered by the school, Aetna, you should have received a card in your mailbox last fall. If you did not, please come by the health center and they can print you a copy.

• If you have insurance through another source, such as you parents, you should have card from them. Check with whomever’s policy you are on and ask for it.

• When you call a provider for your first appointment, have your card in your hand. They will need to register you, and will need to know all those numbers on the card. They will also need to know the name and birth date of the policy holder, so be sure to have that knowledge.

• If you need a provider, your insurance company should be able to give you a list of providers in your area that accept your plan. Look on the back of your card for their number.


www.montserrat.edu

Letterpress Printmaking Workshop

2014-03-19 15_53_29-ellegee007 on Instagram

LETTERPRESS PRINTMAKING
with Brian Savignano
Sat. & Sun.  April 5 – 6, 9 am – 4 pm

Students will learn the basics of hand typesetting, letterpress terminology and the fundamentals of letterpress printing. We will complete two projects, the first being a collaborative, group print as we gain a feel for the process. Students will apply what they have learned to complete the second project, a folded greeting card of their design. Those with recent letterpress experience at Montserrat will be given the option to devote more time to their second project. Materials will be provided, and each student will leave with a minimum of 12 greeting cards.

Prerequisite: beginners – none, intermediates – prior letterpress experience

Price: $175, non–credit 

To register, contact:
Shelton Walker
Director, Continuing & Professional Studies
shelton.walker@montserrat.edu or 978.867.9661
montserrat.edu/continuing-ed/spring/courses


www.montserrat.edu

Bear Gallery’s Book Arts Show

Montserrat’s student-run Bear Gallery’s current Book Arts Show had a reception on Tue. March 18, at 100 Cummings Center, Suite 106-H.

unnamed

From left: Henry Long, Alexandra Rios and Joyce Tat

unnamed (6)

 Joyce Tat displaying her book art.

unnamed (5)

 Alexandra Rios displaying her book art.


www.montserrat.edu

Career Services Update: Summer Opportunities

1395960_571098389611273_955090509_n
Full-time
PT / Temp/ Summer 

Freelance 

Internships 
Competitions

For the latest updates on Jobs and Summer Opportunities follow Montserrat’s Career Services on Twitter!

Montserrat’s Office of Career Services provides students and alumni with practical information and advice for professional career development. Our staff of artists and career professionals combines for a total 20 years of experience helping individuals navigate through the working world. Through internships, workshops, and opportunities to interact with practicing artists and professionals working in the field, the Montserrat Community actively engages with the Arts and Creative Industries beyond its walls.

Kirk Snow
Director of Career Services
kirk.snow@montserrat.edu
978.921.4242 x 1611

Amy Ruiter Amy Ruiter
Assistant Director of Career Services
amy.ruiter@montserrat.edu
978.921.4242 x 1610


www.montserrat.edu

Summer Immersive Workshops Featured Faculty: Dan Welden

unnamed-6

Week-long art workshops
june 9 – july 11

From painting and fiber arts to comics and digital photography, our diverse summer immersives are designed to allow participants time and instruction to explore new avenues of creative inquiry. We invite you to spend your summer devoted to your art in the unique environment that only a working art college can offer.

unnamed-7Featured Faculty

Dan Welden, master printmaker and painter, has had more than 70 international solo exhibitions. He has collaborated with and/or printed for many prominent artists including Willem de Kooning, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Robert Motherwell and Kurt Vonnegut. Welden is responsible for the discovery and development of the Solarplate process and is co-author with Pauline Muir of Printmaking in the Sun. He will be teaching Solarplate Etching the week of June 9 – 13.

Summer Exhibition Opportunities

301 Gallery: Summer Immersive students past and present have the opportunity to submit work for a juried exhibition at Montserrat College of Art this summer.

Marblehead Art Association: Students who enroll in courses led by Tim Hawkesworth, Barbara Moody, or Maria Malatesta will have the opportunity to exhibit their work at the Marblehead Art Association, alongside the work of their instructors.

Our Subjects:

PaintingDrawingEncausticsEnamelsPrintmakingBook ArtsLetterpressComicsMetal SculpturePaper SculptureSculptural WeavingFiber ArtsInterdisciplinary  & Online Course

Apply Now!

 

CALL FOR APPLICANTS

This year we are delighted to offer two fellowship awards, one for High School Educators, and one for Montserrat Alumni. Awards offer full tuition, housing and the opportunity to give an artist’s talk. For more information, and to apply, visit our website.


www.montserrat.edu

Nimmer’s Grand Steampunk Exhibition

Steam-7The show is at the Wood Museum of Springfield History (21 Edwards St, Springfield, MA) and opens on Saturday, March 22 during regular museum hours – 10am to 5pm and will remain on view until September 28, 2014.

On display is a re-creation of the one and only known steampunk machine that was built by the Schlermer, Schloutmer and Schlitmeinster Schteampunk Company of Springfield, MA around 1844. This factory made use of a primitive assembly line to organize completely unrelated parts and useless components to make things (or “thingamabobictums” as they were known at the time). These machines were notorious for using devices that weren’t invented yet. Unfortunately, S.S.S.S.S. Company was in business for only three weeks before its own workers burned it to the ground.

Steam-4The disgruntled workers were distraught because this steampunk factory made devices that only looked cool, but had no actual purpose except to look like they did something… but they didn’t. There were no customers for such devices until the advent of the Home Shopping Network more than a century and a half later. Not wanting to pass judgment, Nimmer thinks we can all agree that this visionary company was far ahead of its time!Schteampunk-1

Photos of the steampunk sculpture that Dean Nimmer, Gary Hallgren and Peter Dellert made for the Steampunk show in Springfield, MA. In addition, Nimmer created a collage based on the steampunk theme along with his friend Janet Stupak that is part of the show as well.

 


www.montserrat.edu

Improbable Places Poetry Tour Gets Cooking in the Kitchen

1901962_557588241007237_1109075656_n

The Improbable Places Poetry Tour
Thursday, March 27, 7  pm
Eurostoves, The Culinary Centre
45 Enon Street, Beverly, MA

This month, as snow continues to melt outside, poets and writers will stoke the fires of creativity at the latest stop on the Improbable Places Poetry tour. On Thursday, March 27 at 7 p.m. at 45 Enon Street, Eurostoves, a Beverly-based supplier of cookware and kitchen appliances, will open its culinary center – usually home to knife-wielding chefs – to poets brandishing pens. Writers and spectators alike are invited to join in the fun, which will include a cooking demonstration and a cash bar.

Montserrat College of Art’s Writing Center Director and poetry tour organizer Colleen Michaels says poets are invited to share poems on a culinary theme. “Poems about best meals, kitchen tools, and grandmothers are all welcome,” she says. “We’re looking for poems that snap like a pea in spring, stir like a wooden spoon, and aren’t afraid to raid the refrigerator.”

This stop is the second on this year’s poetry tour; last stop found poets gathering at Mowers Barber Shop in Beverly where voices blended with snipping scissors and buzzing electric razors. The evening included poems about the sensuality of wet hair, the joy of a fresh crew cut and the history of the haircut.

Send your submissions to colleen.michaels@montserrat.edu.

The submission deadline is Thursday, March 20 and we are hungry for work!

I don’t write poetry, but I sure am interested in this tour. Can I still attend the event? Sure! The event is free, open to the public, and you might even pick up some mad chopping skills.

Wait! I’ve still got questions!
Just talk to Colleen Michaels, Montserrat’s Writing Studio Director
at colleen.michaels@montserrat.edu or 978-921-4242 x1277.

See you in the kitchen!

72266_459261060757_5458729_n

456372_10150659234165758_1079951876_o


www.montserrat.edu

Montserrat Students Document the Workers and Closure of Salem Power Plant

Honoring the end of an era 
Art students, power plant workers creating legacy
By Will Broaddus, Staff writer

Salem: Dumond Thebaud speaks about his work at the Salem Power Plant while being recorded on video. Art students from Montserrat are undertaking a project to document the experiences of workers at the plant.

Salem: Dumond Thebaud speaks about his work at the Salem Power Plant while being recorded on video. Art students from Montserrat are undertaking a project to document the experiences of workers at the plant.

After Salem Harbor Station closes in May, its huge structures will come down and most of its workers will move on.

To make sure their stories don’t disappear along with the 500-foot smokestack, 28 students at Montserrat College of Art have been conducting interviews with plant employees that will become part of an archive. These stories will also serve as the inspiration for student paintings, sculptures and videos that celebrate the workers’ careers, and will be exhibited at the plant this July.

Ken Yuszkus/Staff photo Electrician Dumond Thebaud speaks about his work at the Salem power plant while being recorded on stills and video. Montserrat College art student Rebekah Segar, left, shows still photographs she took to Alicia Parent. Ken Yuszkus/Staff photo

Electrician Dumond Thebaud speaks about his work at the Salem power plant while being recorded on stills and video. Montserrat College art student Rebekah Segar, left, shows still photographs she took to Alicia Parent.
Ken Yuszkus/Staff photo

“The general theme they’re beginning to see is how the workers treat each other like a family,” said Elizabeth Cohen, who teaches at Montserrat and is helping coordinate the project. “Some have worked there for 20, 30 years. They’re constantly caring for the plant as if it was a family member, and the plant has cared for them.”
The Montserrat class is being sponsored by Footprint Power of New Jersey, which acquired the coal and oil-burning plant in 2012, and plans to replace it with one that burns natural gas.
The idea for the project developed in a conversation between Peter Furniss, CEO of Footprint, and Stephen Immerman, president of Montserrat College.
“It provides a constructive output for my staff,” Furniss said. “Many are good storytellers, and they have their own kind of artistic sensibilities around their work.”
“I think there’s a lot of grieving going on on the part of my staff, with the loss of the plant, loss of jobs and loss of family they’ve built there over many decades. I know it’s helpful for them.”

Dumond Thebaud, right, speaks about his work at the Salem power plant while being recorded on video. Art students from Montserrat, from left, are Alicia Parent, Rebekah Segar, Adam Kooken, and Dan Stone. Workers' stories will inspire an art exhibit this summer honoring their legacy. Ken Yuszkus/Staff photos

Dumond Thebaud, right, speaks about his work at the Salem power plant while being recorded on video. Art students from Montserrat, from left, are Alicia Parent, Rebekah Segar, Adam Kooken, and Dan Stone. Workers’ stories will inspire an art exhibit this summer honoring their legacy.
Ken Yuszkus/Staff photos

Students started visiting the plant in late January, touring its control rooms, turbines and shops, and they recorded brief videos that introduced them to the workers.
“We wanted them to meet each other, but because of all the security and scheduling it was really cumbersome. We couldn’t get a big group together,” said Ethan Berry of Beverly, one of three faculty members working with the students. “These people are busy running a plant.”
Those workers who chose to participate in the project — about 22 of the plant’s more than 100 employees — in turn recorded videos in which they talked about their work. These provided a starting point for interviews, which the students started to conduct last Friday.

 
They continued yesterday as Berry led a group of nine students to the plant, where they donned hard hats, safety glasses and fluorescent vests identifying them as artists.

One group visited the electrical shop to speak with Dumond Thebaud, who started out shoveling coal but is currently an electrician and has held several other jobs in more than 30 years at the plant.
Another student visited Miledy Santana in the plant’s chemistry lab, and a third group interviewed Ed Daddoli, who works in mechanical maintenance.As the students become more familiar with the workers, they will formulate proposals for artworks they want to create for the exhibit.

 

“The students are being asked to interpret,” Berry said. “One student’s interviewing just the women, to hear their stories. Another person is taking pictures of the people working and using them as outlines to make sculptures. Another one is making costumes and having some of the workers reenact episodes that happened.”

Salem:  Dave Burke talks with Katherine Roldan, left, and Kaitlyn Assmann, center, at the Salem Power Plant. Art students from Montserrat are undertaking a project to document the experiences of workers at the plant.

Salem: Dave Burke talks with Katherine Roldan, left, and Kaitlyn Assmann, center, at the Salem Power Plant. Art students from Montserrat are undertaking a project to document the experiences of workers at the plant.

“So they are going to be interpreting, and there’s going to be flat artwork — drawing, photographs — and sculptures. There’s going to be a mural that’s going to involve the community, all kinds of different things.”

Student Melissa Tremblay wants to paint pictures of each worker’s boots, which will serve as “a symbol of their lives,” and was partly inspired by a painting by Vincent Van Gogh, Cohen said.

Kaitlyn Assmann, from Syracuse, N.Y., has asked workers to describe the first moment they saw the plant, and will use their responses in the soundtrack for an animated film.
Berry said the class is a valuable opportunity for students to get outside their studios and learn to articulate their ideas in the real world.

At the same time, the archive they and the workers are creating, along with the artistic visions it is inspiring, are recording a world that is passing away.

“I call them ‘end-of-an-era projects,’” Berry said. “I think Peter’s idea was, ‘We can’t let this pass without acknowledging the workers in some way.’”

 


www.montserrat.edu

Gordon Arnold’s Salem News Column: Cabot Street Theatre

562144_561368990562119_1245243962_n

The enduring legacy of the Cabot Street Theatre
Montserrat College of Art Prof. Gordon Arnold

It’s a time of transition for Beverly’s beloved Cabot Street Theatre Cinema. We don’t yet know the ultimate fate of the historic property, which is currently for sale. But whatever happens, its pivotal place in cultural history of the city is secure.

For nearly a century, area residents have known and loved it. Yet, the theater is more than a place of fond memories. The magnificent structure has played a major role in creating the vibrant cultural life of the city that continues today.

The theater opened in 1920 as the Ware Theatre. It was named after its founders, N. Harris Ware and D. Glover Ware. The brothers already operated the popular Larcom Theatre in Beverly, which opened in 1912 just a few blocks away. The early success of the Larcom suggested there would be a demand for a larger and grander facility. The brothers arranged financing and began construction of an opulent new theater on bustling Cabot Street, with an eye toward serving all of the city’s residents. The theater was built to accommodate both movies and stage performances and was truly multipurpose facility.

From the beginning, the theater was a place for the city to come together. While the luminaries of high society were among its earliest patrons, it was no stuffy institution. It drew a wide audience. The best seats were 30 cents (a price that included 3 cents tax), but a balcony seat could be purchased for as little as 20 cents. Children could attend matinees for as little as 11 cents.

In the early 1920s, America’s love affair with Hollywood was just starting. Ornate movie palaces were being built throughout the U.S. to meet the demand for sophisticated new venues. The Ware, with its elegant frescoes, grand fixtures and golden dome, amply met this need and drew widespread praise.

Though these were the days of “silent movies” (the sound era did not start until the late 1920s), movies were seldom seen without musical accompaniment. In fact, announcements for the gala premiere of the theater boasted of a “$50,000 Austin Pipe Organ.” In today’s dollars, this cost was the equivalent of well over half a million dollars.

In the Great Depression of the 1930s, the carefree spirit of the “Roaring Twenties” ended. The popularity of vaudeville waned, but going to the movies remained a staple in American life. The grand theater on Cabot Street became primarily a movie house and eventually changed owners.

Local movie theaters retained their popularity in the 1940s. By the 1950s, however, the popularity of television led to decreased movie attendance. Theaters everywhere suffered.

In addition to competition from television, there were the new realities of suburbia. Movie theaters followed stores and restaurants away from downtown areas to shiny new shopping centers at the outskirts of town. The Northshore Mall, which opened in the late 1950s, was one of earliest of these. In 1963, a multi-screen theater was constructed adjacent to the popular shopping destination. It was a glimpse of the future.

In the following years, customers were increasingly drawn to suburban shopping centers and to the theaters there, some with a dozen or more screens. The aging theater on Cabot Street, like similar venues, came to be seen as relics of a bygone era.

By the mid-1970s Beverly’s downtown theater, which had long since been acquired by the E.M. Loew’s chain and renamed the Cabot Cinema, fell on hard times. It showed mostly second-run films at reduced rates. Although it remained a local attraction that generated many fond memories, it suffered in the wake of changing consumer preferences and the economic crunch of that decade. Finally, Lowe’s decided to sell it.

A new ownership group, led by the late Cesareo Pelaez, acquired the property in 1977 and changed its name to Cabot Street Theatre Cinema. They then began to restore to the theatre to its former splendor.
Pelaez was Renaissance man. He was a college psychology professor and also a stage magician. Soon, in addition to restoring first-rate film programming, the Cabot began weekly stage shows featuring the Le Grand David and his own Spectacular Magic Company.

The live magic show gained national acclaim with its spectacle and old-world charm. The old theater regained its luster and was once again a source of pride for the city. With its rebirth, the reputation of the Cabot was assured for many years.

With Pelaez’s death in 2012 and the closing of the magic show, the future of the theater once again seemed uncertain. In 2013, the Cabot was put up for sale. The search for new owners continues today.
What will happen the Cabot Street Cinema Theatre remains an open question. Until new ownership is secured and plans are made, it’s difficult to predict whether the aging building will continue to be operated a theater for either film or stage.

As a theater for film, there are daunting challenges for any new owner. Hollywood studios are ending distribution of movies on film. Instead, most films will be available only in digital formats. This will require theaters to buy expensive digital projection equipment. Many independent theaters simply can’t afford that cost. It remains possible, of course, that visionary new owners could solve that problem.

Whatever the future of Beverly’s grand old theater, however, the cultural vibrancy that the Cabot helped bring to downtown Beverly a century ago will continue. A formal cultural district is being developed for the downtown area where the Cabot Street Cinema Theatre stands.

Montserrat College of Art, the city of Beverly and Beverly Main Streets, are leading the project. Their goal is to improve to the city’s “livability, civic engagement, and arts appreciation and support.” It’s a fitting development and a testament to the cultural tradition of Beverly that the Cabot Street Cinema Theatre helped create a century ago.

Gordon Arnold, Ph.D., is the author of several books about film and American society and is professor of liberal arts at Montserrat College of Art.

Above artwork: alumnus Jon Bolles ’12, oil on canvas “Cabot Cinema” (36”x48”)


www.montserrat.edu

 

Alumni News: Cheryl Polcaro Exhibits in Chicago

22332_706059l
Alumna Cheryl Polcaro ’99 has had two pieces accepted into the exhibit Who We Aren’t at Union Street Gallery in Chicago, IL. 42 pieces were chosen from hundreds of entries. The exhibit is on view through March 29.

Polcaro shows regularly in local galleries and has recently started to enter juried competitions nationwide. She also has an art studio at Western Avenue Studios in Lowell, MA (#323). Polcaro graduated from Montserrat with a BFA in Illustration in 1999.

Further information can be found on her website: www.cherylpolcaro.com

 


www.montserrat.edu

Opening Reception for Bea Modisett’s Field Work

unnamed-3

Carol Schlosberg Alumni Gallery
Bea Modisett: Field Work
Reception: Thu., March 20, 5 – 7 pm

facebookevent3

On View: March 19 – April 5, 2014
Artist Talk: Wed., March 26, 11:30 am

Montserrat College of Art alumna Bea Modisett’s ’07 paintings present and preserve nature’s instability and impermanence. Her marks accumulate to take on the general shape of changing natural formations. The overall forms in the paintings also relate to cairns and piles of rocks, often found in extreme landscapes. In a sense, each painting becomes a navigational tool, both in its creation and completion.

Bea Modisett,  The White Mountains: Remembered, 2011

Bea Modisett, The White Mountains: Remembered, 2011

Modisett grew up moving back and forth between her birthplace of Washington, D.C and the town of Portsmouth, RI. Since receiving her BFA in painting from Montserrat College of Art in 2007, Modisett has received fellowships to attend the Vermont Studio Center and Hambidge Center for Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, GA. She has exhibited her work throughout New England at locations including Kingston Gallery (Boston), 17 Cox (Beverly), HallSpace (Boston), and the New Hampshire Institute of Art (Manchester, NH). Modisett currently lives and works in Beverly.

For a complete list of upcoming visiting artists visit:
montserrat.edu/galleries/

For more information on Montserrat Galleries Public Programs:
please contact Savery Kelley at savery.kelley@montserrat.edu


www.montserrat.edu

Colleen Michaels Update

Colleen

Writing Center Director Colleen Michaels‘ poem Medeski, Martin, and Wood at Dinner has been published in Hawai’i Review 79: Call & Response, Issue 79, 2014.

A copy of the journal is currently in Montserrat’s Paul Scott Library circulation desk.

Also, her poem is one of the featured storytellers for A Winter’s Tale in Portsmouth, NH on March 16.

As the season turns and sunset arrives later each day, March’s theme encourages reflection on growth, change, and thresholds crossed, featuring stories by a range of creative people including writer and host of Newburyport’s Tannery Series, Dawne Shand; writer Zach Foote; poet and artist Colleen Michaels; musician and comedian Jon Lessard; actor and web developer Kevin Baringer; and writer and filmmaker Jason Santo. Each storyteller will take a turn before the crowd, relying only on memory to share a 10-minute true story from their own lives. Learn more here!

Also, her wildly successful Improbable Places Poetry Tour has been featured in the April 2014 issue of Northshore Magazine on page 44. Click here to read the article! 

Her next Improbable Places Poetry Tour stop is Thursday, March 27, at Eurostoves, The Culinary Centre (45 Enon Street, Beverly). This month’s theme is In the Kitchen.”  Send your submissions to her at colleen.michaels@montserrat.edu by March 20. Learn more here!

Congratulations, Colleen!Northshore Magazine - April 2014 Colleen2


www.montserrat.edu

Salem Film Fest Class Interview

Salem Film Fest Class Interview
“DISCOVERING DOCUMENTARY” AT SALEM FILM FEST”

unnamed

Documentary film has the power to teach us about the unfamiliar and to help us discover new realities.  A guide can be helpful in this journey – enter Erin Trahan, Editor and Publisher of The Independent.Salem Film Fest audiences might recognize Trahan from the filmmaker forums and Q&A sessions she’s monitored in the past. She’s also involved behind the scenes as a member of multiple juries every year, helping to decide which films featured at SFF leave Salem with honors.

This year, Erin has partnered with SFF and Montserrat College of Art in creating and leading an interactive classroom/festival experience, “Discovering Documentary: Tools for Educators, Filmmakers, and Astute Viewers,” which combines a theoretical introduction to the documentary genre, from origins to the latest trends. As part of the students’ education on how to use documentary film in education or community settings as well, Trahan will be bringing her class to Salem Film Fest to see some of the premier documentaries currently being produced.
SFF Organizer Jeff Schmidt had the chance to speak with Trahan after her first class to discuss the role documentaries can play in today’s classrooms, why the class is important, and how Salem Film Fest can help support the lessons learned in the classroom.
Jeff Schmidt:  What was your goal and inspiration in designing this class and why partner with Salem Film Fest?
Erin Trahan:  The goal is to bring together people who already have an appreciation for documentary film in order to deepen their knowledge both of the form and ways to access movies, especially locally. Salem Film Fest is a great fit as it’s already a tremendous resource for documentary lovers, and it’s right next door! The thinking behind the class is to enhance what the festival offers annually with additional focused dialogue and community-building.
JS:  What is it about the documentary form that lends itself as a teaching tool for educators?
ET:  Documentary has always been interested in the actual and the factual. It’s roots are in presenting new and unseen worlds to its audiences or taking a close, sometimes academic look at a culture or political situation or conflict. Though students today might be inundated with moving image, it remains evocative and irresistible. Turn on a TV and all eyes will turn their attention to it, at least for a while. Documentary gives teachers a powerful way to engage students on a huge range of current and historical topics.
JS:  Do you think documentary film has become more accessible to general audiences over the last few years?  If so, why?
ET:  Not necessarily in terms of theatrical releases. Art house cinemas, where most documentaries screen, are doing their best to stay afloat but it’s not uncommon for an American to live a good two hours drive from an independently-owned cinema. Of course the Internet and online streaming options have opened things up a great deal. Now the challenge for viewers is to sort through the plethora of titles and find ones that are worth their time.
JS:  What films at this year’s festival will your class be viewing?
ET:  We’ll be seeing TOKYO WAKA and EVERYBODY STREET together as a class though my guess is that class members will be seeing a good five or six more films throughout the fest.

JS:  What are you hoping your students will take away from this class?
ET:  If each student discovers one new local film festival to explore or indie theater to check out plus a new friend, the class would have exceeded my goals! As much as I’d like for students to leave feeling informed, I want them leaving feeling the abundance of opportunity they have to see documentary and directly engage with filmmakers and programmers working in this region.

For more information about “Discovering Documentary: Tools for Educators, Filmmakers, and Astute Viewers,” visit montserrat.edu/continuing-ed/spring/salem-film-fest-class


www.montserrat.edu

Summer Immersives Featured Faculty: John Murray

Murray_John_bio

John Murray, born in Boston in 1942, has lived in Los Angeles, Provincetown and Boston. For more than 40 years he has explored his bleak/sensual aesthetic through paints and mediums of all descriptions, as well as printmaking and assemblages. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, and exhibits widely throughout the North East. jmurrayart.com

This summer, he will be teaching a Summer Immersive course through our Continuing Education Department:

Supercharged Painting
Instructor: John Murray
June 16 – 20 | Mon. – Fri. | 9am – 4pm

This course begins with the notion that Jackson Pollock liberated painting and takes off from there. Students will investigate various painting media including acrylic, glazes, pigments, and collage. Both figurative and abstract approaches are encouraged in this energetic class with an emphasis on Post Modern plasticity and visual language.

Murray_John_course

Register Now
Prerequisite: none required
Price: $795; $715 Early Bird rate (register before April 10)

For more information, please contact the Continuing Education Office at 978.921.4242 x 1202 or email ce@montserrat.edu


www.montserrat.edu